ENTRIES TAGGED "publishing models"

Shakespeare and the myth of publishing

Reinventing publishing: what can we do now that we're no longer tied to the myth of stable literary objects?

Note: this post started as a Foo Camp 2013 session. A few weeks ago, Tim O’Reilly sent around a link to Who Edited Shakespeare?, which discussed the editor for the First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays. It included a lot of evidence that someone had done a lot of work regularizing spelling and doing other…
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Data-driven publishing is the future

Data-driven publishing is the future

James Levy explains how publishers can use the Hiptype platform to make smarter publishing decisions.

As our industry shifts from print to ebooks we’re discovering a wealth of new data to study. Retailers hold most of the cards for this data, but a startup named Hiptype is looking to change that. In the interview below, Hiptype’s president and CEO James Levy (@jamtoday) talks about how their platform works and how it can…
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Publishing times, they are a-changin’

Panelists at the inaugural NYC Publishing Innovators Meetup discuss changing publishers' roles.

The NYC Publishing Innovators Meetup group held its inaugural roundtable in its quarterly speaker series in July. Panelists, led by Kat Meyer as moderator, included: Ned Lomigora, co-founder of Zeeen.com; Diane Gedymin, executive editor at Turner Publishing; Peter Balis, director of online sales, John Wiley & Sons; Linda Holliday,…
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Never, ever "out of print"

Never, ever "out of print"

How POD and ebooks make traditional contract models irrelevant.

In a recent interview, attorney Dana Newman tackled issues surrounding publishing rights in the digital landscape. She said changes in the current model are needed to keep things equitable for both publishers and authors.

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A huge competitive advantage awaits bold publishers

A huge competitive advantage awaits bold publishers

Eric Ries on how lean startup methods apply to publishing.

In this video interview, "The Lean Startup" author Eric Ries talks about his experiences working with traditional publishing structures and how publishers can benefit from lean startup principles.

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When you commit to "release early and often" you have to actually do it

When you commit to "release early and often" you have to actually do it

"Every Book Is a Startup" author Todd Sattersten on agile methods and the importance of scope.

We follow up with BizBookLab's Todd Sattersten to see how his startup project, "Every Book Is a Startup," is coming along. Sattersten looks at the relationship between startup pitches and book pitches, and he explains why scope is a valuable project tool.

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Getting the content out there isn't enough anymore

Justo Hidalgo on subscriptions, paywalls and the importance of added value.

In this interview, 24Symbols' Just Hidalgo examines the relationship between high-quality content, related services and consumer needs.

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How agile methodologies can help publishers

How agile methodologies can help publishers

Bookigee's Kristen McLean says agile techniques from the software world also apply to publishing.

Bookigee founder Kristen McLean explains how lightweight development, flexible teams and other agile methods can help publishers with content development and workflows.

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A venture into self-publishing

A venture into self-publishing

Scott Berkun on his experiences from both sides of the publishing fence.

Scott Berkun turned to self-publishing with his latest book, "Mindfire." In this TOC podcast, Berkun discusses the experience and says the biggest surprise was the required PR effort. He also says traditional and self-publishing don't need to be polarized options, for authors or for publishers and editors.

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What publishers can learn from Netflix's problems

What publishers can learn from Netflix's problems

Tim Carmody on the lessons from Netflix and the facade of inevitability.

In this interview, Wired.com writer Tim Carmody examines the recent missteps of Netflix and he takes a broad look at how technology shapes the reading experience.

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