ENTRIES TAGGED "quora"

Four short links: 1 January 2013

Four short links: 1 January 2013

Silicon Beats Meat, Workers against Machines, Quora Design Notes, and Free Data Science Books

  1. Robots Will Take Our Jobs (Wired) — I agree with Kevin Kelly that (in my words) software and hardware are eating wetware, but disagree that This is not a race against the machines. If we race against them, we lose. This is a race with the machines. You’ll be paid in the future based on how well you work with robots. Ninety percent of your coworkers will be unseen machines. Most of what you do will not be possible without them. And there will be a blurry line between what you do and what they do. You might no longer think of it as a job, at least at first, because anything that seems like drudgery will be done by robots. Civilizations which depend on specialization reward work and penalize idleness. We already have more people than work for them, and if we’re not to be creating a vast disconnected former workforce then we (society) need to get a hell of a lot better at creating jobs and not destroying them.
  2. Why Workers are Losing the War Against Machines (The Atlantic) — There is no economic law that says that everyone, or even most people, automatically benefit from technological progress.
  3. Early Quora Design Notes — I love reading post-mortems and learning from what other people did. Picking a starting point is important because it will be the axis the rest of the design revolves around — but it’s tricky and not always the first page in the flow. Ideally, you should start with the page that serves the most significant goals of the product.
  4. Free Data Science BooksI don’t mean free as in some guy paid for a PDF version of an O’Reilly book and then posted it online for others to use/steal, but I mean genuine published books with a free online version sanctioned by the publisher. That is, “the publisher has graciously agreed to allow a full, free version of my book to be available on this site.” (via Stein Debrouwere)
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Four short links: 28 October 2011

Four short links: 28 October 2011

Open Access, Retro Crypto, Open Source Q&A, and Music Visualization

  1. Open Access Weeka global event promoting Open Access as a new norm in scholarship and research.
  2. The Copiale Cipher — cracking a historical code with computers. Details in the paper: The book describes the initiation of “DER CANDIDAT” into a secret society, some functions of which are encoded with logograms. (via Discover Magazine)
  3. Coordino — open source Quota-like question-and-answer software. (via Smashing Magazine)
  4. Baroque.me — visualization of the first prelude from the first Cello Suite by Bach. Music is notoriously difficult to visualize (Disney’s Fantasia is the earliest attempt that I know of) as there is so much it’s possible to capture. (via Andy Baio)
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Four Short Links: 2 February 2011

Four Short Links: 2 February 2011

Visualization Papers, Immersive Learning, Readability, and Quora's Technology

  1. Seven Foundational Visualization Papers — seven classics in the field that are cited and useful again and again.
  2. Git Immersion — a “walking tour” of Git inspired by the premise that to know a thing is to do it. Cf Learn Python the Hard Way or even NASA’s Planet Makeover. We’ll see more and more tutorials that require participation because you don’t get muscle memory by reading. (NASA link via BoingBoing
  3. Readability — strips out ads and sends money to the publishers you like. I’d never thought of a business model as something that’s imposed from the outside quite like this, but there you go.
  4. Quora’s Technology Examined (Phil Whelan) — In this blog post I will delve into the snippets of information available on Quora and look at Quora from a technical perspective. What technical decisions have they made? What does their architecture look like? What languages and frameworks do they use? How do they make that search bar respond so quickly? Lots of Python. (via Joshua Schachter on Delicious)
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