ENTRIES TAGGED "scifoo"

Four short links: 11 March 2011

Four short links: 11 March 2011

Mobile Data, Startup Ideas, Sci Foo, and Instapaper

  1. The Coming Mobile Data Apocalypse (Redmonk) — it is clear that the appetite for mobile bandwidth will grow exponentially over the next twelve to eighteen months. With high volumes of smartphones shipping, more and larger form factors entering the market, and the accelerating build out of streaming services, bandwith consumption is set to spike. Equally apparent is that the carriers are ill provisioned to address this demand, both from a network capacity perspective as well as with their pricing structures.
  2. Hamster Burial Kit and 998 Other IdeasFor Seth Godin’s Alternative MBA program, this week the nine of us came up with 111 business ideas each. But ideas are only valuable when someone (like you) makes something happen. What follows are our 999 business ideas, free for the taking.
  3. Sci Foo Short Videos — questions posed to Sci Foo attendees with interesting answers. I liked “What Worries You?”
  4. Instapaper 3 Released — all the features are ones I’ve wanted, which tells me Marco is listening very closely to his customers. Again I say: Instapaper changes the way I use the web as much as RSS did.
Comments Off |
Four short links: 13 December 2010

Four short links: 13 December 2010

Mobile Clawback, Language Design, Gawker Hacked, and Science Tools

  1. European mobile operators say big sites need to pay for users’ data demands (Guardian) — it’s like the postal service demanding that envelope makers pay them because they’re not making enough money just selling stamps. What idiocy.
  2. Grace Programming Language — language designers working on a new teaching language.
  3. Gawker Media’s Entire Database Hacked — 1.5M usernames and passwords, plus content from their databases, in a torrent. What’s your plan to minimize the harm of an event like this, and to recover? (via Andy Baio)
  4. Macmillan Do Interesting Stuff (Cameron Neylon) — have acquired some companies that provide software tools to support scientists, and are starting a new line of business around it. I like it because it’s a much closer alignment of scientists’ interests with profit motive than, say, journals. Timo Hannay, who heads it, runs Science Foo Camp with Google and O’Reilly.
Comment: 1 |