ENTRIES TAGGED "sensors"

Four short links: 9 August 2012

Four short links: 9 August 2012

Economics of Innovation, Bio Imagery, Open Source EEG for Smartphone, and Feynman Bio

  1. Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy (Amazon) — soon-to-be-released book by Bill Janeway, of Warburg-Pincus (and the O’Reilly board). People raved about his session at scifoo. I’m bummed I missed it, but I’ll console myself with his book.
  2. Cell Image Librarya freely accessible, easy-to-search, public repository of reviewed and annotated images, videos, and animations of cells from a variety of organisms, showcasing cell architecture, intracellular functionalities, and both normal and abnormal processes. The purpose of this database is to advance research, education, and training, with the ultimate goal of improving human health. And an excellent source of desktop images.
  3. Smartphone EEG Scanner — unusually, there’s no Kickstarter project for an iPhone version. (Designs and software are open source)
  4. Feynman — excellent graphic novel bio of Feynman, covering the science as well as the personality. Easy to read and very enjoyable.
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Sensors and Arduino: How to glue them together

Sensors and Arduino: How to glue them together

Author Federico Lucifredi on developing sensor-enabled Arduino sketches.

Federico Lucifredi (@federico_II) is the maintainer of man(1) and also the author of the upcoming book, Sensor Interfaces for Arduino. We had a chance to sit down recently and talk about how to connect sensors to microcontrollers (in particular Arduino). Given how many sensors there are in the wild, there’s a lot to say about sensors. Some…
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Four short links: 1 August 2012

Four short links: 1 August 2012

Chinese Hackers, Edible Sensors, Quantum Physics

  1. China Hackers Hit EU Point Man and DC (Bloomberg) — wow. The extent to which EU and US government and business computer systems have been penetrated is astonishing. Stolen information is flowing out of the networks of law firms, investment banks, oil companies, drug makers, and high technology manufacturers in such significant quantities that intelligence officials now say it could cause long-term harm to U.S. and European economies. (via Gady Epstein)
  2. Digestible Microchips (Nature) — The sand-particle sized sensor consists of a minute silicon chip containing trace amounts of magnesium and copper. When swallowed, it generates a slight voltage in response to digestive juices, which conveys a signal to the surface of a person’s skin where a patch then relays the information to a mobile phone belonging to a healthcare-provider. (via Sara Winge)
  3. Quantum Mechanics Make Simple(r) — clever way to avoid the brain pain of quantum mechanics and leap straight to the “oh!”. [N]ature is described not by probabilities (which are always nonnegative), but by numbers called amplitudes that can be positive, negative, or even complex. [...] In the usual “hierarchy of sciences”—with biology at the top, then chemistry, then physics, then math—quantum mechanics sits at a level between math and physics that I don’t know a good name for. Basically, quantum mechanics is the operating system that other physical theories run on as application software (with the exception of general relativity, which hasn’t yet been successfully ported to this particular OS). (via Hacker News)
  4. Selectively De-Animating Video — SIGGRAPH talk showing how to keep some things still in a video. Check out the teaser video with samples: ZOMG. I note that Maneesh Agrawala was involved: I’m a fan of his from Line Drive maps and 3D exploded views, but his entire paper list is worth reading. Wow. (via Greg Borenstein)
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From smartphones and continuous data comes the social MRI

From smartphones and continuous data comes the social MRI

Dr. Nadav Aharony used phone sensors to explore personal behaviors and community trends.

It’s clear at this point that the smartphone revolution has very little to do with the phone function in these devices. Rather, it’s the unique mix of sensors, always-on connectivity and mass consumer adoption that’s shaping business and culture. Dr. Nadav Aharony (@nadavaha) tapped into this mix when he was working on a “social MRI” study in MIT’s…
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Editorial Radar with Mike Loukides & Mike Hendrickson

Editorial Radar with Mike Loukides & Mike Hendrickson

Discussion on machine learning, 3D printing, devices and JavaScript

In this first episode of "Editorial Radar," O'Reilly editors Mike Loukides and Mike Hendrickson discuss the important technologies they're tracking.

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The Reading Glove engages senses and objects to tell a story

The Reading Glove engages senses and objects to tell a story

Karen Tanenbaum uses wearable tech and sensors to explore the boundaries of storytelling.

What if you mashed up a non-linear narrative, a tangible computing environment and a hint of a haunted house experience? You might get the Reading Glove, a novel way to experience a story.

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Visualization of the Week: AntiMap

Visualization of the Week: AntiMap

A mobile mapping app lets users capture and visualize their movements.

The DIY mapping tool AntiMap lets users capture their movements via their mobile devices, then visualize and analyze their movements.

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Top Stories: December 5-9, 2011

Top Stories: December 5-9, 2011

A vote against frictionless sharing, a look at cloud security threats, and why the open sourcing of Data.gov matters.

This week on O'Reilly: Mike Loukides explained why there's little value in frictionless sharing, Jeffrey Carr examined the significant security threats attached to cloud services, and we learned why the open sourcing of Data.gov is an important milestone for open government.

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Stickers as sensors

Stickers as sensors

GreenGoose looks to unlock the data in everyday activities.

Put a GreenGoose sticker on an object, and just like that, you'll have an Internet-connected sensor. In this interview, GreenGoose founder Brian Krejcarek discusses stickers as sensors and the data that can be gathered from everyday activities.

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Sensors, data, UI and the future of publishing

Tweets and related information from Tim O'Reilly's Silverchair Strategies 2011 presentation.

In a recent keynote address, Tim O'Reilly looked at how sensors, data and interfaces will shape information delivery.

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