"social graph" entries

Four short links: 7 February 2012

Four short links: 7 February 2012

Version Control, Data Tables, Developer Communities, and Reality Mining

  1. Integrated Content Editor (GitHub) — a track changes implementation, built in javascript, for anything that is contenteditable on the web, written by the NY Times team and open sourced.
  2. Data Tables — featureful jQuery plugin for tables of data. (via Javascript Weekly)
  3. Creating a Developer Community (Slideshare) — treat the problem like a channel conversion funnel: turn visitors into downloaders, downloaders into users, users into contributors. His screenshots of shitty conversions are great! (via Kohsuke Kawaguchi)
  4. Sex Differences in Intimate Relationships (PDF) — Albert-Laszlo Barabasi and others use social graph analysis to analyze communications patterns in relationships. Notice that not only does the preference for an opposite-sex “best friend” kick in significantly earlier for females than for males (~18 years vs mid-20s, respectively), but females maintain a higher plateau value for much longer. More reality mining to understand ourselves. (via Sean Gourley)
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Four short links: 6 February 2012

Four short links: 6 February 2012

E-Commerce Analytics, Text Mining on Hadoop, Bozonics, and It's Safe To Write With a Mac Again

  1. Jirafe — open source e-commerce analytics for Magento platform.
  2. iModela — a $1000 3D milling machine. (via BoingBoing)
  3. It’s Too Late to Save The Common Web (Robert Scoble) — paraphrased: “Four years ago, I told you all that Google and Facebook were evil. You did nothing, which is why I must now use Google and Facebook.” His list of reasons that Facebook beats the Open Web gives new shallows to the phrase “vanity metrics”. Yes, the open web does not go out of its way to give you an inflated sense of popularity and importance. On the other hand, the things you do put there are in your control and will stay as long as you want them to. But that’s obviously not a killer feature compared to a bottle of Astroglide and an autorefreshing page showing your Klout score and the number of Google+ circles you’re in.
  4. iBooks Author EULA Clarified (MacObserver) — important to note that it doesn’t say you can’t use the content you’ve written, only that you can’t sell .ibook files through anyone but Apple. Less obnoxious than the “we own all your stuff, dude” interpretation, but still a bit crap. I wonder how anticompetitive this will be seen as. Apple’s vertical integration is ripe for Justice Department investigation.
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Four short links: 25 January 2012

Four short links: 25 January 2012

Mobile v Web, Great Privacy Policy, Libraries Now, and Google's Social Strategy

  1. Mobile Overtaking Web — provocatively packaged extrapolations of ComScore and similar numbers to conclude that Americans spend more time interacting with mobile apps than with web sites. I’m sure you could beat an iPhone developer to death with the error bars.
  2. Best Privacy Policy Ever — satiric privacy policy from a Firefox plugin.
  3. The Time for Libraries is Now — forceful presentation on the need for librarians (aka “information professionals”) in an age of excess information.
  4. Google 2011 vs Microsoft 1995 (Nelson Minar) — interesting analysis which prompted Andy Baio‘s comment Google will be in trouble if their strategy succeeds, or if it doesn’t.
Comments: 2
Four short links: 24 January 2012

Four short links: 24 January 2012

Facebook Apps, Google+ Remover, Mind Hacks Books, and Pirate Bay Adds Physical Objects

  1. fbootstrap (GitHub) — HTML, CSS, and JS toolkit for Facebook apps based on Twitter’s popular Bootstrap library.
  2. Focus on the User — adds a bookmarklet “Don’t Be Evil” which shows your Google search as it would have been before Google+ began artificially inserting itself into Google search results. Written by Facebook engineer and Firefox co-creator Blake Ross, this is a gloriously subtle commentary on the pollution of search results from the privileging of Google+.
  3. Treasure Hunt for Mysteries of Mind and Brain (Mind Hacks) — one of the coauthors of Mind Hacks, Tom Stafford, has written two small self-published books on the cool things you can do with your brain: exploring your blind spot, and lucid dreaming.
  4. Pirate Bay Launches Physical Object CategoryWe believe that the next step in copying will be made from digital form into physical form. It will be physical objects. Or as we decided to call them: Physibles. Data objects that are able (and feasible) to become physical. We believe that things like three dimensional printers, scanners and such are just the first step. We believe that in the nearby future you will print your spare parts for your vehicles. You will download your sneakers within 20 years. We at O’Reilly believe this too. (via Annalee Newitz)
Comment: 1

Visualization of the Week: Visualizing your friends' Facebook likes

Tony Hirst's Facebook visualization shows "social interest positioning."

Tony Hirst used Google Refine and Gephi to reveal the likes his Facebook friends have in common.

Comments: 2

Visualization of the Week: Visualizing your friends’ Facebook likes

Tony Hirst's Facebook visualization shows "social interest positioning."

Tony Hirst used Google Refine and Gephi to reveal the likes his Facebook friends have in common.

Comments: 2

Strata Week: The social graph that isn't

Pinboard founder questions the social graph, Cloudera and Kaggle raise money for big data.

In this week's data news, Pinboard founder Maciej Ceglowski challenges the notion of a "social graph," Cloudera and Kaggle raise money for big data, and the Supreme Court looks at GPS and privacy issues.

Comments: 3

Strata Week: The social graph that isn’t

Pinboard founder questions the social graph, Cloudera and Kaggle raise money for big data.

In this week's data news, Pinboard founder Maciej Ceglowski challenges the notion of a "social graph," Cloudera and Kaggle raise money for big data, and the Supreme Court looks at GPS and privacy issues.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 9 November 2011

Four short links: 9 November 2011

Social Graph Dismissed, Anonymous Explained, Resistance Explored, and Android Improved

  1. The Social Graph is Neither — Maciej Ceglowski nails it. Imagine the U.S. Census as conducted by direct marketers – that’s the social graph. Social networks exist to sell you crap. The icky feeling you get when your friend starts to talk to you about Amway, or when you spot someone passing out business cards at a birthday party, is the entire driving force behind a site like Facebook.
  2. Anonymous 101 (Wired) — Quinn Norton explains where Anonymous came from, what it is, and why it is.
  3. Antibiotic Resistance (The Atlantic) — Laxminarayan likens antibiotics resistance to global warming: every country needs to solve its own problems and cooperate—but if it doesn’t, we all suffer. This is why we can’t have nice things. (via Courtney Johnston)
  4. Deep Idle for Android — developer saw his handset wasn’t going into a deep-enough battery-saving idle mode, saw it wasn’t implemented in the kernel, implemented it, and reduced battery consumption by 55%. Very cool to see open source working as it’s supposed to. (via Leonard Lin)
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Four short links: 13 July 2011

Four short links: 13 July 2011

Freebase in Node, Form Styling, Implicit Friendships, and Dyslexic Font

  1. Freebase in Node.js (github) — handy library for interacting with Freebase from node code. (via Rob McKinnon)
  2. Formalize — CSS library to provide a standard style for form elements. (via Emma Jane Hogbin)
  3. Suggesting More Friends Using the Implicit Social Graph (PDF) — Google paper on the algorithm behind Friend Suggest. Related: Katango. (via Big Data)
  4. Dyslexia — a typeface for dyslexics. (via Richard Soderberg)
Comment: 1