ENTRIES TAGGED "SPDY"

Four short links: 8 June 2012

Four short links: 8 June 2012

Speedy Proxy, SPDY Reviewed, MySQL Automation, and LinkedIn Checker

  1. HAproxy — high availability proxy, cf Varnish.
  2. Opera Reviews SPDY — thoughts on the high-performance HTTP++ from a team with experience implementing their own protocols. Section 2 makes a good intro to the features of SPDY if you’ve not been keeping up.
  3. Jetpants — Tumblr’s automation toolkit for handling monstrously large MySQL database topologies. (via Hacker News)
  4. LeakedIn — check if your LinkedIn password was leaked. Chris Shiflett had this site up before LinkedIn had publicly admitted the leak.

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Four short links: 25 April 2012

Four short links: 25 April 2012

Online Courses, mod_spdy, Dying Industries, and Javascript Conference Report

  1. World History Since 1300 (Coursera) — Coursera expands offerings to include humanities. This content is in books and already in online lectures in many formats. What do you get from these? Online quizzes and the online forum with similar people considering similar things. So it’s a book club for a university course?
  2. mod_spdy — Apache module for the SPDY protocol, Google’s “faster than HTTP” HTTP.
  3. The Top 10 Dying Industries in the United States (Washington Post) — between the Internet and China, yesterday’s cash cows are today’s casseroles.
  4. Notes from JSConf2012 — excellent conference report: covers what happens, why it was interesting or not, and even summarizes relevant and interesting hallway conversations. AA++ would attend by proxy again. (via an old Javascript Weekly)
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Four short links: 27 September 2011

Four short links: 27 September 2011

Source Code, SPDY Trials, Data from Facebook, and Voting Tools

  1. Phabricator — Facebook-built web apps that make it easy to write, review, and share source code. (via Simon Gianoutsos)
  2. The Slow Way to SPDY — attempting to actually try SPDY for yourself sounds like a nightmare as getting hold of a stable SPDY implementation at this point is not unlike an uphill climb on a slow mudslide – the protocol is currently on its third draft but not really stable, most of the available code is outdated, and despite the links on this page, hardly any of it is easy to get to work in a weekend. (via Nelson Minar)
  3. Get Your Data from Facebook — European privacy law means Facebook must tell you what they know about you. The sample responses they’ve given to people are eye-wateringly detailed. This takes on more importance once you realize Facebook tracks you when you’re not logged in.
  4. Referendum Tool — New Zealand faces a referendum on voting system (currently “mixed member proportional”), and this page is an interesting approach to helping you figure out which system you should endorse based on your preferences for how a voting system should work (“It is better if the Government is made up of one party, with a majority in Parliament, so that that party can implement its policies, and react decisively to events as they come up” vs “It is better if the Government is made up of a group of parties (a coalition), so that its decisions better reflect what the majority of voters want, even if that means important decisions might be delayed.”). I like this because it helps you understand translate your preferences into a specific vote.
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