"sysadmin" entries

Four short links: 1 September 2014

Four short links: 1 September 2014

Sibyl, Bitrot, Estimation, and ssh

  1. Sibyl: Google’s System for Large Scale Machine Learning (YouTube) — keynote at DSN2014 acting as an intro to Sibyl. (via KD Nuggets)
  2. Bitrot from 1997That’s 205 failures, an actual link rot figure of 91%, not 57%. That leaves only 21 URLs as 200 OK and containing effectively the same content.
  3. What We Do And Don’t Know About Software Effort Estimation — nice rundown of research in the field.
  4. fabric — simple yet powerful ssh library for Python.
Comment: 1

Exploring lightweight monitoring systems

Toward unifying customer behavior and operations metrics.

lightweight_systemsFor the last ten years I’ve had a foot in both the development and operations worlds. I stumbled into the world of IT operations as a result of having the most UNIX skills in the team shortly after starting at ThoughtWorks. I was fortunate enough to do so at a time when many of my ThoughtWorks colleagues and I where working on the ideas which were captured so well in Jez Humble and Dave Farley’s Continuous Delivery (Addison-Wesley).

During this time, our focus was on getting our application into production as quickly as possible. We were butting up against the limits of infrastructure automation and IaaS providers like Amazon were only in their earliest form.

Recently, I have spent time with operations teams who are most concerned with the longer-term challenges of looking after increasingly complex ecosystems of systems. Here the focus is on immediate feedback and knowing if they need to take action. At a certain scale, complex IT ecosystems can seem to exhibit emergent behavior, like an organism. The operations world has evolved a series of tools which allow these teams to see what’s happening *right now* so we can react, keep things running, and keep people happy.

At the same time, those of us who spend time thinking about how to quickly and effectively release our applications have become preoccupied with wanting to know if that software does what our customers want once it gets released. The Lean Startup movement has shown us the importance of putting our software in front of our customers, then working out how they actually use it so we can determine what to do next. In this world, I was struck by the shortcomings of the tools in this space. Commonly used web analytics tools, for example, might only help me understand tomorrow how my customers used my site today.

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5 unsung tools of DevOps

A Free Velocity Report

cover-5-unsung-toolsWhen I first started as a sysadmin many years ago, I quickly realized what a daunting task was before me. Like any good engineer, I took to finding the right tools to keep at hand to make light work out of the most difficult situations. This in itself was quite an endeavor, as over the years there has been a proliferation of tools and scripts. Many are of the artisanal, organic, hand-crafted variety, forged out of bash pipelines by our forefathers.

Much of that has changed now as the DevOps movement strengthens. With closer interaction between developers and operations, or even operations teams composed of developers, the tools have significantly improved. Treating infrastructure as code with automated configuration management and provisioning tools have freed many from the menial tasks of creating snowflake systems, and we’ve turned our attention to the more important matters of scaling and optimizing our systems.

In my Velocity report, 5 Unsung Tools of DevOps, I highlight a few of the tools that have gone unnoticed—or at least unrecognized—for some time. These are but a few of the tools that recognized needs early on and that successfully solve real-world problems that you’re likely to encounter today. Here is a brief synopsis:

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Early-Warning Is an Unknown Unknown

Velocity 2013 Speaker Series

In 2002, US Secretary of State Donald Rumsfeld told a reporter that not only don’t we know everything important, but sometimes we don’t even know what knowledge we lack:

There are known knowns; there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns – the ones we don’t know we don’t know.

One of the purposes of monitoring is to build early-warning systems to alert of problems before they become serious. But how can we recognize a failure in its early stages? It’s a thorny question.

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Velocity Report: Building a DevOps Culture

DevOps is as much about culture as it is about tools.

Operations professionals live in a wind tunnel. If you can imagine one of those game show glass boxes, where a contestant stands inside, the door shuts, and money blows around in a whirlwind, you’ve got a good idea of what Operations feels like much of the time. While you’re trying to grab one technology, another has forced itself across your eyes demanding attention.

The incredible growth of an industry that didn’t really even exist fifteen years ago has provided us with endless opportunity and innovations. It’s also required us to be on the forefront of many new technologies in a way other professions aren’t. The constant drive towards the next technology, the next platform, and the next idea has stratified our organizations, creating specializations in areas like networking, storage, security, data sciences, and a myriad of other functions that challenge our ability to work with our colleagues as a cohesive team.

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What's New in CFEngine 3: Making System Administration Even More Powerful

CFEngine is a surprisingly flexible and fast tool for distributed configuration management. A new version was released this week.

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What’s New in CFEngine 3: Making System Administration Even More Powerful

CFEngine is a surprisingly flexible and fast tool for distributed configuration management. A new version was released this week.

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Four short links: 30 August 2011

Four short links: 30 August 2011

Post-PC Numbers, OS X Admin Tool, C Templating, and Real Life Minecraft Cube

  1. Data Monday: From PC to Tablet (Luke Wroblewski) — some great stats here. Sales of Apple’s iPad pulled in 30% more than all of Dell’s consumer PC business in just the first half of the year.
  2. Munkimunki is a set of tools that, used together with a webserver-based repository of packages and package metadata, can be used by OS X administrators to manage software installs (and in many cases removals) on OS X client machines.
  3. Crustache (GitHub) — a fast C implementation of the Mustache templating engine. (via Hacker News)
  4. Minecraft Cube in Real Life — clever hardware hack with projection and Arduino sensing.
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Happy SysAdmin Appreciation Day!

Happy SysAdmin Appreciation Day!

Did you do anything on the web today? Thank a SysAdmin.

If you are reading this (or any other) page, sending a message, watching a video, reading an email, or doing anything else that touches the web, you can thank a SysAdmin.

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