"technology" entries

My top 5 predictions for CIOs in 2011

Don't expect an easy ride in 2011. The challenges for CIOs will be more complex and disruptive.

As we look to 2011, the enlightened CIO must go after the most valuable projects and be a trusted adviser to those who commit dollars to organizational goals.

Comment: 1

Taking stock of my 2010 tech predictions

4 "corrects," 4 "maybes," and 2 "nos": Jonathan Reichental re-examines his 2010 predictions.

In January 2010, I published a list of my technology predictions for the year ahead. While I hit a few right on, I certainly over-estimated the rate of change.

Comments: 2

IT transformations must begin with hearts and minds

Radical IT change starts not with technology, but with collaboration.

IT transformation must be managed in a deliberate manner. Heavy lifting is essential, but it should not be the first thing that gets done. Radical change must start with the CIO and his or her managers engaging in collaborative discussions across the business.

Comments: 5

CIO: Chief Inspiration Officer?

Creating a tech vision is one of the most effective things a CIO can do.

Inspiring staff through a tech strategy is one of the lowest costs, yet most effective activities a CIO can do. A vision that produces positive results reminds everyone why we do this work.

Comments: 4

Makers versus Sponges

School tech should start with a simple question: Will students absorb others' ideas or make their own?

Today's technology lets us choose if we want to absorb other people's ideas or build our our own. Shouldn't that be starting point when we argue about the role of technology in schools?

Comments: 19

Venture capitalists do it. Why shouldn't philanthropists do it, too?

Our problems in education are too intense, funding is too thin and time too precious to take on duplicative efforts. We need to apply some of the same discriminating standards in our philanthropic Edu2.0 projects that we use in for-profit ones.

Comments: 26

What would technology do best for learning?

An evolving set of best practices would help educational technology projects

An evolving set of best practices could offer a big lift for educational technology projects. Established best practices could define standards of quality and help others avoid pitfalls. Toward that end, here's a collection of thoughts intended to help those developing their own projects.

Comments: 11

One way to build a smarter school infrastructure

A new partnership gives teachers and schools help with tech integration

Ask a hundred kids to draw a picture of “home” and you’ll see some common themes: “home” should be safe, warm, fun, inviting. There should be room to play, to rest, to grow — maybe even to work. And then there will be a million differences, including laugh-out-loud details (bunkbeds on the ceiling?) as well as sweet ones. Ask a…

Comments: 3

Drop testing edutech

How teachers use technology rarely matches how it was designed.

We drop test hardware before we send it into the field. Seems like it's time to start drop testing software programs before sending them into the classroom.

Comments: 10

Quarantined Conferences: Claustrophobic Technophiles or Attentive Audiences?

Loren Feldman. 1938 Media. Audience Conference. That’s about as much of a summary as you’ll find about the Audience Conference held in New York last Friday. That’s because there were no open laptops allowed during the performances. There was also no Wi-Fi, no video streaming, no tweeting, and no blogging. I disagree with the notion that everything needs to be live streamed, live blogged, and live tweeted merely because we can.

Comments: 14