ENTRIES TAGGED "transportation"

Four short links: 10 November 2010

Four short links: 10 November 2010

Facebook Behaviour, Multitouch Modelling, Early Ads, and Gaming Public Transportation

  1. Risk Reduction Strategies on Facebook (danah boyd) — Mikalah uses Facebook but when she goes to log out, she deactivates her Facebook account. She knows that this doesn’t delete the account – that’s the point. She knows that when she logs back in, she’ll be able to reactivate the account and have all of her friend connections back. But when she’s not logged in, no one can post messages on her wall or send her messages privately or browse her content. Two very interesting practices designed to maintain not just some abstract idea of “privacy” but, more important, control.
  2. Beautiful Modeler a software tool for gestural sculpting using a multi-touch controller such as an iPad. (via Andy Baio)
  3. How Telephone Directories Transformed America — this caught my eye: Less than a year after the New Haven District Telephone Company issued its first directory, it issued a second, and that one augmented listings with advertising. (via Pete Warden)
  4. Chromaramaa game that shows you your movements and location as you swipe your Oyster Card in and out of the Tube. Points are awarded for avoiding rush hour, visiting new stations, etc. They say they want to change behaviour, but I don’t believe people ride public transportation to collect points, so they travel when they have to and so won’t change their commute times. Would love to be proven wrong, though. (via Roger Dennis)
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Local government: data supplier

Local government: data supplier

Portland, Oregon's open data lessons can apply elsewhere.

Skip Newberry's IgniteGov talk highlighted the potential of open data initiatives to create more economic activity, civic engagement and improve the life of citizens.

Comment: 1
Four short links: 4 November 2010

Four short links: 4 November 2010

Better Travel, Incidental Media, Social Switch, and Crumbling Cookies

  1. The Journey (Matt Jones) — an incredible reimagining of what travel could be if we used technology subtly, playfully, and helpfully. This is beautiful and brilliant. Read the explanation of the different elements in the video, there’s a month’s worth of sparking ideas in just a few paragraphs.
  2. Incidental Media (Jack Schulze) — beautiful playful visual demonstration of what happens when surfaces are active but do not claim our full attention. From the same BERG London work that prompted The Journey above. I don’t normally put two links to the same site in the one edition of Four Short Links, but these are both mindbuggeringly good.
  3. 1st Fans Shifts to Meetup — Brooklyn Museum’s online connection to their community moves from Facebook+Twitter to Meetup. There’s a wonderfully honest and informative explanation of why the two big social sites didn’t work for them. Great to see them sharing what they learned.
  4. HTTP Cookies, or How Not To Design a Protocol — detailed deconstruction of the deeply broken state of web site cookies. (via Matt Biddulph on Delicious)
Comments: 2
Four short links: 15 January 2010 Four short links: 15 January 2010

Four short links: 15 January 2010

Best Science Blogging, Nat Friedman, State of the World, MTA Data

  1. The Open Laboratory — collection of the best science writing on blogs from the last year. For more, see an interview with the author. Part of a growing trend where online comes first and feeds offline. (via sciblogs)
  2. Nat Friedman Leaving Novell — one of the original Ximian founders, with interests in many directions and the coding chops to make them real. He’ll found another startup, topic as yet unknown, which will be one to watch.
  3. Bruce Sterling’s State of the World 2010 — sometimes funny, often thought-provoking, always interesting. Americans really want and need and desire a Futuristic Vision Thing, they get all lonesome and moody without one, but it’s absolutely gotta be one of those good-old-fashioned American Futuristic Vision Things, just like the Americans had in the 1950s when everybody else was still on fire from total war and cleaning up the death camps.
  4. MTA Releases Data — NYC finally releases transit data, free for developers to reuse. (via timoreilly on Twitter)
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