ENTRIES TAGGED "visualisation"

Visualization of the Week: Politicians' word counts

Visualization of the Week: Politicians' word counts

The New York Times looks at the word counts of presidential candidates.

This week's visualization comes from The New York Times and is an example of the increasing usage of visualizations to make political arguments.

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Four short links: 19 January 2012

Four short links: 19 January 2012

Android Fragmentation, Hosting Technologies, Face Recognition, and Data Design

  1. Fragmentation is Not The End of Android — full of trenchant insights, this post considers the many implications of the Android value chain. Only Apple directly profits from being an OS provider in the mobile ecosystem. For Google it is a cost center particularly struck me. Anyone know whether Google offers to (for money) maintain branded carrier- and/or device-specific versions of Android? Seems like a natural business model given their development pipeline and desire to ensure availability of updates. (via John Gruber)
  2. Chart of Y Combinator Companies’ Hosting Decisions — just what it says.
  3. Muststache — fun Chrome extension using face recognition to add mustaches to faces in pictures. Ten years ago, almost every kind of face recognition was a dark art requiring many computrons. Today it’s a toy.
  4. Stamen’s 2011 — frankly astonishing year of beautiful and meaningful visualizations and design. They continue to provide the benchmarks for designing with data.
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Visualization of the Week: AntiMap

Visualization of the Week: AntiMap

A mobile mapping app lets users capture and visualize their movements.

The DIY mapping tool AntiMap lets users capture their movements via their mobile devices, then visualize and analyze their movements.

Comment: 1
Four short links: 23 December 2011

Four short links: 23 December 2011

Preview Colourblindness, Commandline Datamining, Open Source Indexing, and Javascript Time Series

  1. See the World as a Colour-Blind Person Would — filters that let you see images as protanopes, deuteranopes, and even tritanopes would see them. I am protanoptic (if that’s a word) and I can vouch that the “after” pix look the same as “before” to me. Care, because about 8% of men have some form of colourblindness and hate you and your “red is bad, green is good” visual cues. (via Flowing Data)
  2. Wafflesseeks to be the world’s most comprehensive collection of command-line tools for machine learning and data mining.
  3. LinkedIn Open Sources Index and Query Services — full-text index and retrieval engine, APIs, and a framework to manage indexes on infrastructure-as-a-service.
  4. Rickshawa JavaScript toolkit for creating interactive time series graphs.
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Visualization of the Week: Mapping traffic casualties

Visualization of the Week: Mapping traffic casualties

A BBC visualization maps every traffic casualty in the UK between 1999-2010.

More than a decade's worth of traffic accident data is plotted out in a BBC visualization. Locations with a history of accidents are hard to miss.

Comments: 2
Visualization of the Week: Visualizing Bach

Visualization of the Week: Visualizing Bach

An artist blends sound and design to visualize the prelude to Bach's Cello Suites.

It's rare when a visualization sounds as good as it looks, but that's the case with Alexander Chen's sonic and visual rendering of Bach's Cello Suites.

Comment: 1
Four short links: 3 June 2011

Four short links: 3 June 2011

Distributed Drug Money, Science Game, Beautiful Machine Learning, and Stream Event Processing

  1. Silk Road (Gawker) — Tor-delivered “web” site that is like an eBay for drugs, currency is Bitcoins. Jeff Garzik, a member of the Bitcoin core development team, says in an email that bitcoin is not as anonymous as the denizens of Silk Road would like to believe. He explains that because all Bitcoin transactions are recorded in a public log, though the identities of all the parties are anonymous, law enforcement could use sophisticated network analysis techniques to parse the transaction flow and track down individual Bitcoin users. “Attempting major illicit transactions with bitcoin, given existing statistical analysis techniques deployed in the field by law enforcement, is pretty damned dumb,” he says. The site is viewable here, and here’s a discussion of delivering hidden web sites with Tor. (via Nelson Minar)
  2. Dr Waller — a big game using DC Comics characters where players end up crowdsourcing science on GalaxyZoo. A nice variant on the captcha/ESP-style game that Luis von Ahn is known for. (via BoingBoing)
  3. Machine Learning Demos — hypnotically beautiful. Code for download.
  4. Esper — stream event processing engine, GPLv2-licensed Java. (via Stream Event Processing with Esper and Edd Dumbill)
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Four short links: 23 May 2011

Four short links: 23 May 2011

PC in JS, Musical Visualization, S3 Parallel, and Tech-led Ed

  1. PC Emulator in Javascript — days later and it’s mindboggling.
  2. US Home Prices as Opera (Flowing Data) — reminded me of Douglas Adams’s “Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency” which has software that turns your company’s performance numbers into music. The yearly accounts of most British companies emerged sounding like the Dead March from “Saul”, but in Japan they went for it like a pack of rats. It produced lots of cheery company anthems that started well, but if you were going to criticise you’d probably say that they tended to get a bit loud and squeaky at the end.
  3. s3cmd Parallel — command-line tool with parallel uploads to s3. (via Nelson Minar)
  4. Eight of China’s Top Nine Government Officials are Scientists (Singularity Hub) — the article’s idiotic reduction to performance on standardised tests misses America’s primary strength against China, namely creative and flexible workforce. China will get there, but it’s not there yet.
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Four short links: 5 May 2011

Four short links: 5 May 2011

MongoDB for Guardian, Visualization Book, Mobile CouchDB, and Fast Approximate String Retrieval

  1. Why We Chose MongoDB for Guardian.co.uk (SlideShare) — they’re using MongoDB’s flexible schema, as schema upgrades were pain in their previous system (Oracle). I think of these as the database equivalent of dynamic typing in languages like Perl and Ruby. (via Paul Rowe)
  2. Solving Problems with Visual AnalyticsThis book is the result of a community effort of the partners of the VisMaster Coordinated Action funded by the European Union. The overarching aim of VisMaster was to create a research roadmap that outlines the current state of visual analytics across many disciplines, and to describe the next steps that have to be taken to foster a strong visual analytics community, thus enabling the development of advanced visual analytic applications. (via Mark Madsen)
  3. iOS-Couchbase (GitHub) — a build of distributed key-value store CouchDB, which will keep your mobile data in sync with a remote store. No mean feat given CouchDB itself has Erlang as a dependency. (via Mike Olson)
  4. SimStringA fast and simple algorithm for approximate string retrieval in C++ with Python and Ruby bindings, opensourced with modified BSD license. (via Matt Biddulph)
Comments: 3
Got an iPhone or 3G iPad? Apple is recording your moves

Got an iPhone or 3G iPad? Apple is recording your moves

A hidden file in iOS 4 is regularly recording the position of devices.

Pete Warden and Alasdair Allan have discovered that iPhones and 3G iPads running iOS 4 are regularly recording the location of devices into a hidden file.

Comments: 261