"visualization" entries

Four short links: 28 May 2013

Four short links: 28 May 2013

Geeky Primer, Visible CSS, Remote Working, and Raspberry Pi Sentiment Server

  1. My Little Geek — children’s primer with a geeky bent. A is for Android, B is for Binary, C is for Caffeine …. They have a Kickstarter for two sequels: numbers and shapes.
  2. Visible CSS RulesEnter a url to see how the css rules interact with that page.
  3. How to Work Remotely — none of this is rocket science, it’s all true and things we had to learn the hard way.
  4. Raspberry Pi Twitter Sentiment Server — step-by-step guide, and github repo for the lazy. (via Jason Bell)
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In-Memory Databases, Burning Silos, Reintroducing Dart, and Google Glass Gatherings

Weekly Highlights and Insights: May 19-25

In-memory Databases: A discussion of near real-time manipulation of massive datasets

Burning the Silos: Minimize boundaries to reduce product cycle times.

Dart Is Not the Language You Think It Is: Seth Ladd’s enthusiastic reintroduction of Dart prompts a voluminous discussion on Slashdot.

Is that the Google Glass?: The anthropology of an always-on society

Tracing the Disappeared: An interactive visualization of CIA rendition flights

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Google I/O, Big Data Adolescence, Visualization, and the Future of Open Source

Weekly Highlights and Insights: May 13-17

Google I/O: O’Reilly Editor Rachel Roumeliotis reports from the conference floor.

Big Data, Cool Kids: Fumbling toward the adolescence of big data tools.

Code as Art: Interactive Data Visualization for the Web author Scott Murray on becoming a code artist.

Real-time World-wide Wikipedia Edits: Stephen LaPorte and Mahmoud Hashemi’s addictive visualization.

Future of Open Source: The quality, security, and community driving open source adoption.

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11 Essential Features that Visual Analysis Tools Should Have

Visual analysis tools are adding advanced analytics for big data

After recently playing with SAS Visual Analytics, I’ve been thinking about tools for visual analysis. By visual analysis I mean the type of analysis most recently popularized by Tableau, QlikView, and Spotfire: you encounter a data set for the first time, conduct exploratory data analysis, with the goal of discovering interesting patterns and associations. Having used a few visualization tools myself, here’s a quick wish-list of features (culled from tools I’ve used or have seen in action).

Requires little (to no) coding
The viz tools I currently use require programming skills. Coding means switching back-and-forth between a visual (chart) and text (code). It’s nice1 to be able to customize charts via code, but when you’re in the exploratory phase not having to think about code syntax is ideal. Plus GUI-based tools allow you to collaborate with many more users.

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Visualization of the Week: Building collapse rescue efforts

The BBC pulled data from the International Rescue Corps to create an interactive guide to emergency response efforts in a building collapse.

In the wake of recent building collapses, the BBC addressed the question of what goes into the rescue efforts by creating an interactive guide outlining how rescuers approach a collapsed building.

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Weekly Highlights and Insights: April 29-May 3

Leading indicators, CSS selectors, medical data sharing, DDoS visualization, and a new jQuery class

Leading Indicators: Over on O’Reilly Radar, Mike Loukides and Q Ethan McCallum come up with a few ideas for evaluating an organization’s data science program from the “outside.”

CSS Selectors as Superpowers: Simon St. Laurent hopes that “the success of CSS selectors will bring developers to look for other ways to apply pattern-matching to their markup.”

Data sharing drives diagnoses and cures, if we can get there (Parts 1 & 2): Andy Oram explores the take-aways from this year’s Sage Congress.

Visualization of the Week: Jenn Webb shows us Ludovic Fauvet’s Logstalgia visualization of a recent VideoLAN DDoS attack.

jQuery for Advanced Front-End Development: New jQuery class from O’Reilly School of Technology.

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Four short links: 2 May 2013

Four short links: 2 May 2013

Infographics Game, Streaming Money, Robot Interviews, and Inefficient Science Funding

  1. Metrico — puzzle game for Playstation centered around infographics (charts and graphs). (via Flowing Data)
  2. The Lease They Can Do (Business Week) — excellent Paul Ford piece on money, law, and music streaming services. So this is not about technology. Nor is it really about music. This is about determining the optimal strategy for mass licensing of digital artifacts.
  3. How Effective Is a Humanoid Robot as a Tool for Interviewing Young Children? (PLosONE) — The results reveal that the children interacted with KASPAR very similar to how they interacted with a human interviewer. The quantitative behaviour analysis reveal that the most notable difference between the interviews with KASPAR and the human were the duration of the interviews, the eye gaze directed towards the different interviewers, and the response time of the interviewers. These results are discussed in light of future work towards developing KASPAR as an ‘interviewer’ for young children in application areas where a robot may have advantages over a human interviewer, e.g. in police, social services, or healthcare applications.
  4. Funding: Australia’s Grant System Wastes Time (Nature, paywalled) — We found that scientists in Australia spent more than five centuries’ worth of time preparing research-grant proposals for consideration by the largest funding scheme of 2012. Because just 20.5% of these applications were successful, the equivalent of some four centuries of effort returned no immediate benefit to researchers.
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Visualization of the Week: A DDoS attack on VideoLAN downloads infrastructure

Using Logstalgia, developer Ludovic Fauvet created a video visualization of a recent DDoS attack on VideoLAN.

In the wake of a recent DDoS attack on open source software distributor VideoLAN, developer Ludovic Fauvet created a video visualization to show what the attack looked like.

Read more…

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Visualization of the Week: Every recorded U.S terror attack 1970-2011

Using START Global Terrorism data, Simon Rogers mapped every U.S. terror attack recorded between 1970 and 2011.

The recent terror attack at the Boston Marathon prompted the Guardian’s Simon Rogers (who will soon be Twitter’s Simon Rogers) to look into the history of attacks on U.S. soil. Using data from the START Global Terrorism Database, Rogers mapped every recorded terrorist incident in the U.S. from 1970 to 2011.

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Four short links: 10 April 2013

Four short links: 10 April 2013

Street View Tiles Hacks, Policy Simulation, Map Tile Toolbox, and Connected Sensor Device HowTo

  1. HyperLapse — this won the Internet for April. Everyone else can go home. Check out this unbelievable video and source is available.
  2. Housing Simulator — NZ’s largest city is consulting on its growth plan, and includes a simulator so you can decide where the growth to house the hundreds of thousands of predicted residents will come from. Reminds me of NPR’s Budget Hero. Notice that none of the levers control immigration or city taxes to make different cities attractive or unattractive. Growth is a given and you’re left trying to figure out which green fields to pave.
  3. Converting To and From Google Map Tile Coordinates in PostGIS (Pete Warden) — Google Maps’ system of power-of-two tiles has become a defacto standard, widely used by all sorts of web mapping software. I’ve found it handy to use as a caching scheme for our data, but the PostGIS calls to use it were getting pretty messy, so I wrapped them up in a few functions. Code on github.
  4. So You Want to Build A Connected Sensor Device? (Google Doc) — The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of infrastructure, options, and tradeoffs for the parts of the data ecosystem that deal with generating, storing, transmitting, and sharing data. In addition to providing an overview, the goal is to learn what the pain points are, so we can address them. This is a collaborative document drafted for the purpose of discussion and contribution at Sensored Meetup #10. (via Rachel Kalmar)

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