"visualizations" entries

Four Short Links: 2 February 2011

Four Short Links: 2 February 2011

Visualization Papers, Immersive Learning, Readability, and Quora's Technology

  1. Seven Foundational Visualization Papers — seven classics in the field that are cited and useful again and again.
  2. Git Immersion — a “walking tour” of Git inspired by the premise that to know a thing is to do it. Cf Learn Python the Hard Way or even NASA’s Planet Makeover. We’ll see more and more tutorials that require participation because you don’t get muscle memory by reading. (NASA link via BoingBoing
  3. Readability — strips out ads and sends money to the publishers you like. I’d never thought of a business model as something that’s imposed from the outside quite like this, but there you go.
  4. Quora’s Technology Examined (Phil Whelan) — In this blog post I will delve into the snippets of information available on Quora and look at Quora from a technical perspective. What technical decisions have they made? What does their architecture look like? What languages and frameworks do they use? How do they make that search bar respond so quickly? Lots of Python. (via Joshua Schachter on Delicious)
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Four short links: 27 January 2011

Four short links: 27 January 2011

New Browser, Google APIs, NFC Checkin, and XSS Prevention

  1. Mozilla Home Dash — love this experiment in rethinking the browser from Mozilla. They call it a “browse-based browser” as opposed to “search-based browser” (hello, Chrome). Made me realize that, with Chrome, Google’s achieved a 0-click interface to search–you search without meaning to as you type in URLs, you see advertising results without ever having visited a web site.
  2. Periodic Table of Google APIs — cute graphic, part of a large push from Google to hire more outreach engineers to do evangelism, etc. The first visible signs of Google’s hiring binge.
  3. NFC in the Real World (Dan Hill) — smooth airline checkin with fobs mailed to frequent fliers.
  4. XSS Prevention Cheat Sheet (OWASP) — HTML entity encoding doesn’t work if you’re putting untrusted data inside a script tag anywhere, or an event handler attribute like onmouseover, or inside CSS, or in a URL. So even if you use an HTML entity encoding method everywhere, you are still most likely vulnerable to XSS. You MUST use the escape syntax for the part of the HTML document you’re putting untrusted data into. That’s what the rules below are all about. (via Hacker News)
Comment: 1

3 skills a data scientist needs

LinkedIn's Pete Skomoroch on the key capabilities of data scientists.

In this brief video interview, LinkedIn senior research scientist Pete Skomoroch reveals the three core skills of data scientists.

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Visualization deconstructed: Mapping Facebook’s friendships

A deep look at Paul Butler's popular Facebook visualization.

Paul Butler's visualization of Facebook friendships turned a lot of heads recently, and rightfully so. It shows a fascinating connection between virtual relationships and the physical world.

Comments: 6

Visualization deconstructed: Mapping Facebook's friendships

A deep look at Paul Butler's popular Facebook visualization.

Paul Butler's visualization of Facebook friendships turned a lot of heads recently, and rightfully so. It shows a fascinating connection between virtual relationships and the physical world.

Comments: 6

Visualization deconstructed: New York Times “Mapping America”

A look at what works in a census visualization.

In this first post in a new series on data visualization, Sébastien Pierre takes a close look at the New York Times' "Mapping America" interactive census map.

Comments: 7

Visualization deconstructed: New York Times "Mapping America"

A look at what works in a census visualization.

In this first post in a new series on data visualization, Sébastien Pierre takes a close look at the New York Times' "Mapping America" interactive census map.

Comments: 7
Four short links: 31 December 2010

Four short links: 31 December 2010

Statistics, Tech Writing, Shared Spaces, and Delicious Exodus

  1. The Joy of Stats — Hans Rosling’s BBC documentary on statistics, available to watch online.
  2. Best Tech Writing of 2010 — I need a mass “add these to Instapaper” button. (via Hacker News)
  3. Google Shared Spaces: Why We Made It (Pamela Fox) — came out of what people were trying to do with Google Wave.
  4. The Great Delicious Exodus — traffic graph as experienced by pinboard.
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Four short links: 29 December 2010

Four short links: 29 December 2010

GAE Datastore, Datamining Books, Processing Word Clouds, and URL Design

  1. datastore — implementation of Google App Engine Datastore in Java, running on hbase and hadoop. (via Hacker News)
  2. Mining of Massive Datasets — 340 page book from Stanford with the best copyright cautionary coverletter: we expect that you will acknowledge our authorship if you republish parts or all of it. We are sorry to have to mention this point, but we have evidence that other items we have published on the Web have been appropriated and republished under other names. It is easy to detect such misuse, by the way, as you will learn in Chapter 3. (via Delicious)
  3. Wordcram — generate word clouds in Processing. (via jandot on Twitter)
  4. URL Design — the why and how of designing your URLs. Must-read. (via kneath on Twitter)
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Four short links: 27 December 2010

Four short links: 27 December 2010

Compiling to Javascript, Lessons Learned, Idle Insights, and Visualizing Competition

  1. emscripten — LLVM to Javascript compiler. Any code that compiles to LLVM can run in the browser (Python, Lua, C++). LLVM is open source virtual machine that Apple bought into (literally, they hired the developer).
  2. 30 Lessons Learned in Computing Over The Last 10 YearsBackup every day at the minimum, and test restores every week. I don’t think I’ve worked at an organisation that didn’t discover at one point that they couldn’t restore from their backups. Many other words of wisdom, and this one rang particularly true: all code turns into shit given enough time and hands. (via Hacker News)
  3. What Your Computer Does While You Wait — top-to-bottom understanding of your system makes you a better programmer.
  4. How to Visualize the Competition — elegant graphing of strategy. (via Dave Moskovitz on Twitter)
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