ENTRIES TAGGED "voting system"

Four short links: 7 May 2012

Four short links: 7 May 2012

Democratic Software, Gesturable Objects, Likeable Fashion, and Crowdsourcing Drug Design

  1. Liquid Feedback — MIT-licensed voting software from the Pirate Party. See this Spiegel Online piece about how it is used for more details. (via Tim O’Reilly)
  2. Putting Gestures Into Objects (Ars Technica) — Disney and CMU have a system called Touché, where objects can tell whether they’re being clasped, swiped, pinched, etc. and by how many fingers. (via BoingBoing)
  3. Real-time Facebook ‘likes’ Displayed On Brazilian Fashion Retailer’s Clothes Racks (The Verge) — each hanger has a digital counter reflecting the number of likes.
  4. Foldit Games Next Play: Crowdsourcing Better Drug Design (Nature Blogs) — “We’ve moved beyond just determining structures in nature,” Cooper, who is based at the University of Washington’s Center for Game Science in Seattle, told Nature Medicine. “We’re able to use the game to design brand new therapeutic enzymes.” He says players are now working on the ground-up design of a protein that would act as an inhibitor of the influenza A virus, and he expects to expand the drug development uses of the game to small molecule design within the next year.
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Four short links: 27 September 2011

Four short links: 27 September 2011

Source Code, SPDY Trials, Data from Facebook, and Voting Tools

  1. Phabricator — Facebook-built web apps that make it easy to write, review, and share source code. (via Simon Gianoutsos)
  2. The Slow Way to SPDY — attempting to actually try SPDY for yourself sounds like a nightmare as getting hold of a stable SPDY implementation at this point is not unlike an uphill climb on a slow mudslide – the protocol is currently on its third draft but not really stable, most of the available code is outdated, and despite the links on this page, hardly any of it is easy to get to work in a weekend. (via Nelson Minar)
  3. Get Your Data from Facebook — European privacy law means Facebook must tell you what they know about you. The sample responses they’ve given to people are eye-wateringly detailed. This takes on more importance once you realize Facebook tracks you when you’re not logged in.
  4. Referendum Tool — New Zealand faces a referendum on voting system (currently “mixed member proportional”), and this page is an interesting approach to helping you figure out which system you should endorse based on your preferences for how a voting system should work (“It is better if the Government is made up of one party, with a majority in Parliament, so that that party can implement its policies, and react decisively to events as they come up” vs “It is better if the Government is made up of a group of parties (a coalition), so that its decisions better reflect what the majority of voters want, even if that means important decisions might be delayed.”). I like this because it helps you understand translate your preferences into a specific vote.
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