Terry Jones

Terry lives in New York and Barcelona. He hates computers but loves programming; FluidDB is a natural consequence of these conflicting passions. He has 3 great kids who, after years of patience, are asking if they're too small" to use FluidDB, and who also wonder if this is all going to work out. He owns 4 unicycles, was once a circus ringmaster, and likes books.

Terry was previously a postdoc in Zoology at the University of Cambridge where he spent time helping the WHO design part of the human influenza vaccine. He was also a part-time professor in CS at the Universitat de Pompeu Fabra, CTO of Eatoni Ergonomics in New York, a postdoc in Cognitive Science at UCSD, CEO of Teclata in Barcelona, and a postdoc and graduate fellow at the Santa Fe Institute. He has a Ph.D. in CS from the University of New Mexico, an M.Math from the University of Waterloo, and a B.Sc. in CS from Sydney University.

Winners of the writable API competition

Winners of the writable API competition

Announcing the three prize winners of the O'Reilly writable API competition.

We ran a developer contest to see what folks could do with O'Reilly's new "writable" API. Today we're announcing the winners.

Comments: 4

A writable API competition

Got a great idea for O'Reilly's new API? Make it happen and you might win a prize.

Featured Post: We’re launching a developer contest to see what folks can do with O’Reilly’s new “writeable” API. Find out what you’ll need to get started.

Comments: 12
A writable API for O'Reilly

A writable API for O'Reilly

Fluidinfo's new API allows anyone to add information to O'Reilly book and author objects.

Fluidinfo's new O'Reilly API contains information from O'Reilly, Amazon, Google Books, LibraryThing, and GoodReads. But most importantly, anyone can "write" their own information to the book and author objects.

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A writable API for O’Reilly

A writable API for O’Reilly

Fluidinfo's new API allows anyone to add information to O'Reilly book and author objects.

Fluidinfo's new O'Reilly API contains information from O'Reilly, Amazon, Google Books, LibraryThing, and GoodReads. But most importantly, anyone can "write" their own information to the book and author objects.

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The future of publishing is writable

Trends of smaller, easier, and more personal content signal a shift away from read-only publishing.

Terry Jones envisons a future in which we step beyond the default of read-only publishing via traditional containers and APIs. Data itself will become social, and we'll be able to personalize arbitrarily.

Comments: 2

Getting closer to the Web 2.0 address book

The answer to a long-running problem lies in data, not an application.

Given that so much diverse and overlapping information about each of us is spread between applications, why are simple actions — like automatically reacting to known friend requests — still not possible? The answer, notes Terry Jones, lies not with a new application, but in a ball of data. (Part 2 of a 2-part series.)

Comments: 17

Dancing out of time: Thoughts on asynchronous communication

Why asynchronous communication scales, and what we can do with that power.

Terry Jones examines the core differences between synchronous and asynchronous communication, and he looks at how technology has given asynchronous methods tremendous reach. (Part 1 of a 2-part series.)

Comments: 6