Tim O'Reilly

Tim O’Reilly is the founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media Inc. Considered by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world. O'Reilly Media also hosts conferences on technology topics, including the O'Reilly Open Source Convention, Strata: The Business of Data, the Velocity Conference on Web Performance and Operations, and many others. Tim's blog, the O'Reilly Radar "watches the alpha geeks" to determine emerging technology trends, and serves as a platform for advocacy about issues of importance to the technical community. Tim is also a partner at O'Reilly AlphaTech Ventures, O'Reilly's early stage venture firm, and is on the board of Safari Books Online, PeerJ, Code for America, and Maker Media, which was recently spun out from O'Reilly Media. Maker Media's Maker Faire has been compared to the West Coast Computer Faire, which launched the personal computer revolution.

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Dennis Ritchie Day

Dennis Ritchie Day

On 10/30/11 let's remember the contributions of computing pioneer Dennis Ritchie.

I don't have the convening power of a governor, but for those of us around the world who care, I hereby declare this Sunday, October 30 to be Dennis Ritchie Day.

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A focus on the stuff that matters most

Steve Jobs shifted Apple's motivation to great products, not profit.

Profit in a business is like gas in a car. You don't want to run out of gas, but neither do you want to think that your road trip is a tour of gas stations.

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Ada Lovelace Day: Revisiting Limor Fried

Last year, for Ada Lovelace Day, I wrote a post about why I admire Limor Fried, the founder and CEO of Adafruit Industries. This year, I thought I'd talk about Limor again, both because she is such a great example of the engineer/entrepreneur, and because she's working in an emerging area that still isn't being taken as seriously as it…

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Pseudonymity will increasingly disappear

Once we accept a new technological reality, we can come to grips with what to do about it.

An article in "The Atlantic" takes a look at recent facial recognition studies at Carnegie Mellon.

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The future of looking back

Examining the values of legacy in the digital world.

A new book looks to understand our need to collect and archive the things left behind by our ancestors, and how this translates to the digital domain.

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Missing maps and the fragility of digital information

Missing maps and the fragility of digital information

Traditional methods come through when connected systems fail.

A couple of months ago, I had a remarkable demonstration of the fragility of the "always on" connected mindset.

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Sexual Harassment at Technical Conferences: A Big No-No

We don't condone harassment or offensive behavior, at our conferences or anywhere. It's counter to our company values. More importantly, it's counter to our values as human beings.

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Disastrous implications of new Apple patent for blocking cellphone video

Apple has patented new technology to disable cellphone video based on external signals from public venues. Now imagine if that same technology were deployed by repressive regimes.

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Facebook's face recognition strategy may be just the ticket

Facebook's face recognition strategy may be just the ticket

Face recognition is here to stay.

Facebook's face recognition may provide a great strategy for cutting the Gordian Knot on this thorny privacy problem.

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The Responsibility of Running a Business

I love Warren Buffett's sense of the social responsibility inherent in running a business. In his annual report he discusses the particular responsibilities of owning a railroad.

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