Tim O'Reilly

Tim O’Reilly is the founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media Inc. Considered by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world. O'Reilly Media also hosts conferences on technology topics, including the O'Reilly Open Source Convention, Strata: The Business of Data, the Velocity Conference on Web Performance and Operations, and many others. Tim's blog, the O'Reilly Radar "watches the alpha geeks" to determine emerging technology trends, and serves as a platform for advocacy about issues of importance to the technical community. Tim is also a partner at O'Reilly AlphaTech Ventures, O'Reilly's early stage venture firm, and is on the board of Safari Books Online, PeerJ, Code for America, and Maker Media, which was recently spun out from O'Reilly Media. Maker Media's Maker Faire has been compared to the West Coast Computer Faire, which launched the personal computer revolution.

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Missing maps and the fragility of digital information

Traditional methods come through when connected systems fail.

A couple of months ago, I had a remarkable demonstration of the fragility of the "always on" connected mindset.

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Sexual Harassment at Technical Conferences: A Big No-No

We don't condone harassment or offensive behavior, at our conferences or anywhere. It's counter to our company values. More importantly, it's counter to our values as human beings.

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Disastrous implications of new Apple patent for blocking cellphone video

Apple has patented new technology to disable cellphone video based on external signals from public venues. Now imagine if that same technology were deployed by repressive regimes.

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Facebook's face recognition strategy may be just the ticket

Face recognition is here to stay.

Facebook's face recognition may provide a great strategy for cutting the Gordian Knot on this thorny privacy problem.

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The Responsibility of Running a Business

I love Warren Buffett's sense of the social responsibility inherent in running a business. In his annual report he discusses the particular responsibilities of owning a railroad.

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Free to Choose ebook deal reveals the programmer zeitgeist

A list from O'Reilly's Free to Choose Cyber-Monday promotion offers a fascinating view of what's on the minds of the core audience.

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Open government and "next generation democracy"

The pieces are in place and the time is right for government to reinvent itself.

We need to tell the stories of success and failure, of thinking differently, of connecting communities to strengthen bonds, of sharing and coming together to solve problems, and of working on stuff that matters.

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Points of Control: The Web 2.0 Summit Map

Internet companies are jockeying for positions that will benefit them for years to come.

In our planning for this year’s Web 2.0 Summit, John Battelle and I have expanded on the metaphor of “the Great Game,” as we explore the many ways Internet companies at all levels of the stack are looking for points of control that will give them competitive advantage in the years to come.

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Opening the doors of government to innovation

When I organize a conference, I don’t just reach out to interesting speakers. I try to find people who can help to tell a story about what’s important and where the future is going. We’ve been posting speakers for the second annual Gov 2.0 Summit in Washington DC Sept 7-8, but I realized that I haven’t told the story in one place. I thought I’d try to do that here.

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The Louvre of the Industrial Age

The Henry Ford is one of the world's great museums, and the world it chronicles is our own.

I would never in a hundred years have thought of making a visit to Detroit just to visit The Henry Ford museum, but knowing what I know now, I will tell you confidently that it is as worth your while as a visit to Paris just to see the Louvre, to Rome for the Vatican Museum, or to Florence for the Uffizi Gallery. This is truly one of the world's great museums, and the world that it chronicles is our own.

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