Why use Scala

Alex Payne on Scala's upside and combining object-oriented and functional capabilities.

Scala is not strictly a functional programming language — it was designed from the ground up to be an object-oriented and functional hybrid. So programmers need to choose which methodology to use, but both are available. I recently talked with Alex Payne (@al3x), co-author of the book “Programming Scala,” about the advantages of using Scala.

Highlights from the full video interview include:

  • Why should you learn and use Scala? [Discussed at the 0:22 mark]
  • Advantages of combining object-oriented and functional capabilities in a programming language. [Discussed at the 1:24 mark]
  • Back end service development. [Discussed at the 2:56 mark]
  • Could Scala replace Java? [Discussed at the 4:45 mark]
  • Toolkit in use at Simple. [Discussed at the 6:00 mark]
  • How to build a better software development environment. [Discussed at the 7:25 mark]

You can view the entire conversation in the following video:

OSCON 2012 — Join the world’s open source pioneers, builders, and innovators July 16-20 in Portland, Oregon. Learn about open development, challenge your assumptions, and fire up your brain.

Save 20% on registration with the code RADAR

Related:

tags: , , , ,

Get the O’Reilly Data Newsletter

Stay informed. Receive weekly insight from industry insiders.

Get the O’Reilly Web Ops and Performance Newsletter

Weekly insight from industry insiders. Plus exclusive content and offers.

Get the O’Reilly Programming Newsletter

Weekly insight from industry insiders. Plus exclusive content and offers.

Get the O’Reilly Hardware Newsletter

Get weekly insight and knowledge on how to design, prototype, manufacture, and market great connected devices.

Get Four Short Links in Your Inbox

Sign up to receive Nat’s eclectic collection of curated links every weekday.

Get the O’Reilly Design Newsletter

Stay informed. Receive weekly insight from industry insiders.

Get the O’Reilly Web Platform Newsletter

Stay informed. Receive weekly insight from industry insiders—plus exclusive content and offers.

  • Jarle Stabell

    A small note: There’s a factual error in the beginning of this interview, OCaml and F# are not strictly functional, they are also hybrids like Scala, they may “default” to functional, but it’s easy to mix in imperative and OO programming as well.
    OCaml and F# unifies functional, imperative, and OO programming under an ML-like type system.