ENTRIES TAGGED "anthropology"

Four short links: 4 June 2012

Four short links: 4 June 2012

Explore Your World, Cyberwar Cyberon, The Paperlessless Society, and Video Hackery

  1. How To Be An Explorer of the World (Amazon) — I want to take this course on design anthropology but this book, the assigned text, looks like an excellent second best.
  2. StuxNet Was American-Made Cyberwarfare Tool (NY Times) — not even the air gap worked for Iran, “It turns out there is always an idiot around who doesn’t think much about the thumb drive in their hand.”
  3. So Much For The Paperless Society (Beta Knowledge Tumblr) — graph of the waxing and waning use of bond paper in North America. Spoiler: we’re still using a lot.
  4. Magnifying Temporal Variation in VideoOur goal is to reveal temporal variations in videos that are difficult or impossible to see with the naked eye and display them in an indicative manner. Our method, which we call Eulerian Video Magnification, takes a standard video sequence as input, and applies spatial decomposition, followed by temporal filtering to the frames. The resulting signal is then amplified to reveal hidden information. Using our method, we are able to visualize the flow of blood as it fills the face and also to amplify and reveal small motions. Our technique can run in real time to show phenomena occurring at temporal frequencies selected by the user. This is amazing: track the pulse in your face from a few frames. (via Hacker News)
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Top Stories: October 31-November 4, 2011

Top Stories: October 31-November 4, 2011

An author turns to automation, a look at privacy in the age of big data, and a simple rule for data ethics.

This week on O'Reilly: Former author Robbie Allen explained his shift to software-generated writing, Terence Craig said transparency is the best way to handle digital privacy, and we learned how a simple question can keep data companies honest.

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Anthropology extracts the true nature of tech

Anthropology extracts the true nature of tech

Genevieve Bell on how fieldwork and observation can guide technology.

Genevieve Bell, director of interaction and experience research at Intel, talks about how anthropology can inform business decisions and product design.

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