"declarative" entries

Yes, CSS is code

Learning from "The Humble Border-Radius"

One of the best things I overheard at the Fluent Conference was (more or less):

“CSS live coding? I was like, that isn’t code. But then it was.”

Lea Verou had changed the mind of a skeptic.

CSS is not Turing complete (Update: Lea points out that I’m wrong about that), and I’ve long been grateful that it wasn’t designed as an imperative programming language. It can be too much code for designers, too little code for programmers, and yet it’s code.

I think about the graphics work I tried to do with shapes and sprites and assorted kinds of vectors over the years, and then watch this keynote. Even with the glitches and coming improvements she notes, it’s clear that whatever tools I was using at the time, they weren’t declarative enough. (I’d also just seen this JSFest talk on CSS box-shadow by Vince Allen, so I was looking forward to more CSS graphics magic.)

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Declare and It Happens

CSS already making Web code more approachable

Last week, I wrote about the need to make programming, at least much programming, more accessible. I was thinking in terms of business processes, so spreadsheets and flow-based programming sprang to mind. Today, though, Jeremy Keith reminds me that on the Web, we already have much of that world in Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).

“Being a programming language” was never a goal for CSS, which pushed the opposite direction in contrast to Netscape’s JavaScript Style Sheets. There are moments, of course, when developers wish otherwise, and the SASS and LESS preprocessors can give them more functionality. As Keith points out, however:

There are a lot of really powerful programmatic concepts that we could add to CSS, all of which would certainly make it a more powerful language. But I think that power would come at an expense.

Right now, CSS is a relatively-straightforward language.

I suspect some readers are scratching their heads, wondering why CSS is even being considered a language, much less why adding programming features to it would be a bad thing. If you think of CSS as a simple object-manipulation language, though, it fits pretty neatly into the sweet spot I described last week.

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From JavaScript to Declarative Markup

Evolving enhancements for web developers

Web architecture separates structured content (markup), presentation (style), and behavior (JavaScript). As recently as a decade ago, many developers worked in all three, but the years since Ajax arrived have brought more specialization. The rise of JavaScript in particular has led to approaches that have JavaScript carry the load. In the past few weeks, I’ve been delighted to see work that suggests a different path forward, one that takes greater advantage of the flexibility markup offers.

Last week, at the Artifact Conference, I was delighted to return to the world of web designers. The crowd was full of people who know very well what JavaScript can add to their site and how they want to include it, but who don’t focus on it. JavaScript is just a tool, often even a tool wielded later in the process after the basic framing of the site is complete.

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CSS keeps growing

Once used for simple formatting, CSS now dominates the web presentation layer.

Eric Meyer, the author of CSS: The Definitive Guide (and much more) has taught thousands of people CSS through his books, his talks, and his articles. I’ve always enjoyed hearing his take on the state of CSS, as he manages to find combinations of capabilities that make CSS more powerful than I thought it was when I first looked.

We sat down last week to discuss the many huge changes CSS3 is bringing, from improvements to old capabilities to completely new tools for animations, transforms, and layout. The continuous rate of change and the size of the specification are driving him to serialize the next edition of the Definitive Guide, releasing it in pieces. Developers can work from familiar foundations, but reach new destinations. The declarative strength of CSS3 lets you create presentation by describing it, and that style keeps proving more powerful.

Highlights of the interview include: Read more…

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Applying markup to complexity

The blurry line between markup and programming.

When XML exploded onto the scene, it ignited visions of magical communications, simplified document storage, and a whole new wave of application capabilities. Reality has proved calmer, with competition from JSON and other formats tackling a wide variety of problems, while the biggest of the big data problems have such volume that adding markup seems likely to create new problems.

However, at the in-progress Balisage conference, it’s clear that markup remains really good at solving a middle category of problems, where its richer structures can shine without creating headaches of volume or complication. In the past, Balisage often focused on hard problems most people didn’t yet have, but this year’s program tackles challenges that more developers are encountering as their projects grow in complexity.

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