"elixir" entries

Fun, functional, and teachable?

Can Elixir bring functional programming to a much wider audience?

I was delighted to talk with Dave Thomas, co-founder of the The Pragmatic Programmers and author of their in-progress Programming Elixir. I’m writing Introducing Elixir for O’Reilly, and we both seem to be enjoying the progress of the language. Read more…

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Formulating Elixir

Simon St. Laurent and Jose Valim explore a new functional programming language

I was delighted to sit down with Jose Valim, the creator of Elixir, earlier this month at Erlang Factory. He and Dave Thomas had just given a brave keynote exploring the barriers that keep people from taking advantage of Erlang’s many superpowers, challenging the audience with reminders that a programming environment must have reach as well as power to change the world.

Elixir itself is a bold effort to bring Erlang’s strengths to a broader group of developers, adding new strengths, notably metaprogramming, along the way.

Watching Elixir grow has been a unique experience for me. I’ve seen other languages (JavaScript and XSLT) emerge, but Elixir combines solid foundations on prior (Erlang) work with a remarkably open conversation about how to structure the language. Jose tries things and asks for feedback, takes suggestions well, and values questions about how best to make the language accessible. Even without a standards organization, the process has remained open, stable, and productive.

Whether you’re interested in Elixir itself or just in the challenges of creating a new combination in a world filled with past experiments, it’s well worth listening to Jose Valim.

  • We’ve had functional programming since 1959 – why the burst of interest now? [2:10]
  • Moving from Ruby to Erlang “making Rails thread-safe, that was my personal pain-point” [3:13]
  • “Every time I got to study more about the VM, the tooling and everything it provides, my mind gets blown.” [6:12]
  • Why Elixir started, and how it’s changed as Jose learned more. [10:08]
  • Integrating new Erlang features (R17 maps) into Elixir. [15:43]
  • When can you use Elixir in production? [18:07]

I’m looking forward to seeing a lot more Elixir, even as I need to catch up on updating Introducing Elixir. I’m not sure it will conquer the world immediately, but it will certainly leave its mark.

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Walking Trees and Handling Events

The core of web programming, in JavaScript and beyond

This summer, I’ve seen all kinds of programming approaches as I’ve bounced between the Web, XSLT, Erlang, and XML, with visits to many other environments. As I look through the cool new possibilities for interfaces, for scaling up and down, and for dealing with data, I keep seeing two basic patterns repeating: walking trees (of data or document structure), and handling events.

Walking trees can be annoying, to put it mildy. The Document Object Model (DOM) is famously a headache for JavaScript (and other) developers. There are obvious opportunities for advanced developers to focus on graphs and other more flexible data structures as well. Trees are not necessarily the most efficient way to store information, especially when their content changes regularly.

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From BASIC to HyperTalk to JavaScript to Rails to Erlang

Every programming experience teaches

I’ve never formally trained to be a programmer, outside of occasional conference workshops and a week of XSL tutorials. In some ways, that’s terrible, because it’s taken me about thirty years to learn what some friends of mine appear to have learned in four. I’ve written some code that goes way beyond spaghetti, though fortunately the worst of it was probably when I was 15.

On the bright side, when I look past my many mistakes, I can see what I learned from a large number of various different experiences, and the pieces they helped me see. It’s a little easier to tell this story through the parts than it might be through a formal curriculum.

My parents’ FORTRAN books
I was reading computer books—dry ones—before I even got to play. I have vague memories about program structure, but mostly I learned that knowledge sticks better if it includes hands-on work, and not just a book.
Sinclair ZX81
1K of memory! The sheer thrill of seeing my creations on screen was amazing. I had just enough logic to get things done, and leave myself puzzled. The Sinclair community seemed focused on making great small things. I learned simple logic in BASIC and that sometimes it takes a hack to get things done.
Applesoft BASIC
After Sinclair BASIC, Applesoft seemed vast. Much of what I did was transfer what I’d done on the Sinclair (itself a lesson in platform-shifting). As I settled, I started writing larger and larger programs, eventually forcing myself to restructure everything into subroutines…with global variables, of course.
6502 Assembly
I knew there was more than BASIC. My early adventures with assembly language were mostly about graphics, and didn’t work all that well, but I picked up two key things: recursion and the importance of registers.

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Practice Makes Programmers

A few iterations make even functional programming digestible

Programming gets easier and easier as you do more of it. Languages and logic become familiar, in ways that extend from looking up less and less all the way to muscle memory in your typing. The first few iterations in a new language are often difficult, as everything seems odd. Shifting not just to new languages but to new approaches makes practice even more important.

One of my worst features has been that I never liked to practice. I understood rehearsing, working together in a group, but practicing? Exercises, especially for the sake of exercise, were never my thing. That character flaw has hobbled my writing. I can come up with examples for books, focusing tightly on an issue I’m explaining. But then, really? I have to ask readers to go solve a particular (already solved) problem?

I’m not alone in this—too many writers have inflicted that attitude on their readers. Exploring sample code is not the same as writing your own code. Miguel de Icaza points out that:

When you finish a chapter in a modern computing book, there are no exercises to try. When you finish it, your choices are to either take a break by checking some blogs or keep marching in a quest to collect more facts on the next chapter.

During this process, while you amass a bunch of information, at some neurological level, you have not really mastered the subject, nor gained the skills that you wanted.

We can fix this.
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