ENTRIES TAGGED "iPad"

Four short links: 22 December 2010

Four short links: 22 December 2010

Etherpad, Scala, Journalism, and Mazes from Ruby

  1. ietherpad — continuation of the etherpad startup. Offers pro accounts, and promise an iPad app to come. (via Steve O’Grady on Twitter)
  2. Scala Collections Quickref — quick reference card for the Scala collections classes. (via Ian Kallen on Twitter)
  3. Raw Data and the Rise of Little BrotherTurns out, despite the great push for citizen journalism, citizens are not, on average, great at “journalism.” But they are excellent conduits for raw material — those documents, videos, or photos.
  4. Theseus 1.0 — impressive source maze builder in Ruby contributed to the public domain. (via Hacker News)
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Anatomy of an ebook app

Anatomy of an ebook app

Lessons learned while building a top 20 ebook for the iPad.

"Rabbit and Turtle's Amazing Race" was featured by Apple (leading to a 3-5X bost in paid downloads) and for a time became one of the top grossing App Store ebooks. Mark Sigal discusses the lessons he learned while developing and marketing the title.

Comments: 6
Four short links: 29 October 2010

Four short links: 29 October 2010

Tablet Magazines, Ubiquitous Urban Computing, Families and Work, and Twitter Query Language

  1. My iPad Magazine Stand (Khoi Vinh) — My opinion about iPad-based magazines is that they run counter to how people use tablets today and, unless something changes, will remain at odds with the way people will use tablets as the medium matures. They’re bloated, user-unfriendly and map to a tired pattern of mass media brands trying vainly to establish beachheads on new platforms without really understanding the platforms at all. (via Shawn Connally)
  2. Dan Hill Keynote (video) — beautiful and thought-provoking presentation on mining, using, and presenting data in the urban environment.
  3. The Dark Side of Entrepreneurship Continued (Pete Warden) — “work/life balance” is so trite, but I’ve been fascinated by how people deal with it since I heard Joe Kraus talk at Web 2.0 about what he was doing different at his latest startup. He replied that he was working fewer hours because he had a family, and that it was a difficult line to walk but he felt that he was managing it better because it was his second time around.
  4. TweeQL — query language for tweets. Query languages encode use scenarios. They limit what can be done easily but those limits also permit optimizations. I note the arrival of new query languages (cf Yahoo! Pipes) for these reasons. (via raffi on Twitter)
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Bookish Techy Week in Review

Snooki to publish; yet more surveys on who is reading how; tablet sales continue to rise; TOC Frankfurt preview

This week we noticed: Snooki getting a book deal; Google taking an instant dislike to certain word searches; children liking ebooks; Amazon setting up shop at Facebook; Babylonian poetry finding its voice; and some people cutting up their personal library books.

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Four short links: 15 September 2010

Four short links: 15 September 2010

CC Privacy Info, Magic with iPads, SSL in Javascript, and Reading Patents

  1. Privacy Commission Uses CC License For Content — The office of the New Zealand Privacy Commissioner is releasing its content under the CC-BY license, including fact sheets, newsletters, guidance, case studies, howtos, and more.
  2. Magic iPad Light Painting (BERG London) — continuing their stunning work, this concept video uses a form of long-exposure stop-motion to turn the iPad into visual magic.
  3. Implementing TLS and Raw Sockets Using Only Flash and Javascript — interesting first steps to implementing non-trivial security in Javascript (“The Language Of The Future ™”). (via ivanristic on Twitter)
  4. How to Read a Patent in 60 Seconds (Dan Shapiro) — quick guide to the important parts of a patent. For more detail, check out the more detailed docs from the PatentLens.
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Device update: Tablet edition

A look at the Neofonie WeTab, Samsung Galaxy Tab, and Telefunken T9HD

The IFA 2010 may become known as the moment when electronics manufacturers announced their responses to Apple's iPad. Here's a look at notable tablet announcements from the event and other recent news from the world of ereaders and related devices.

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TOC's Wednesday devices, gadgets and ereaders update

With IFA Consumer Electronics Unlimited just days away, this week brings plenty of buzz about new ereaders, tablets and more.

The IFA traditionally offers an early indication of what gadgets will sell well through Christmas. It's no wonder so much attention is focused on the show with order volume stemming from last year's show reaching nearly $3.8 billion.

Comment: 1
What publishers can and should learn from "The Elements"

What publishers can and should learn from "The Elements"

Theodore Gray on true interactivity and apps vs. ebooks.

Theodore Gray, author/creator of "The Elements," shares his thoughts on interactivity in ebooks, why programmers should be treated like authors, and why he believes the print form will continue to exist for quite some time.

Comments: 8
Four short links: 11 August 2010

Four short links: 11 August 2010

iPad Designers, Scientific Cooking, Twitter Psych, Courseware Reach

  1. 10 Essential iPad Apps for Publication Designers — a couple of interesting new suggestions here, including the New Zealand Herald (hated at home for including a bloated intro movie, but with interesting article presentation), and Paris Match (adding interactive features to almost every story). (via Simon St Laurent)
  2. Cooking in Silico: Heat Transfer in the Modern Kitchen (YouTube) — In this talk at the University of Washington, Nathan Myhrvold and Chris Young of Intellectual Ventures show how computationally intense heat-transfer calculations can reveal the subtle factors that influence the success or failure of a cook’s efforts in the kitchen. Explore the virtues of computational cooking, and watch novel techniques and creations made possible when science informs the culinary arts. Mhyrvold has a new cookbook (six volumes!) coming out. (via TechFlash)
  3. Ten Psychological Insights re: Twitter — summary of ten psychological studies about Twitter users. Many but not all of the most-followed Twitter users are, unsurprisingly, celebrities. This top-heavy usage reflects the fact that being interesting is a talent that not everyone can acquire (without relying on the halo effect of being famous that is). Occasionally, though, some manage the trick of being famous and quite interesting, e.g. Stephen Fry. (via vaughanbell on Twitter)
  4. MIT OpenCourseWare: Unlocking Knowledge, Empowering MindsTen years later, MIT Open-CourseWare (OCW) [...] contains the core academic content used in 2000 classes, presenting substantially all the undergraduate and graduate curriculum from MIT’s 33 academic departments. A selection of courses, including introductory physics, math, and engineering, contain full video lectures. Partner organizations have created more than 800 translations of OCW courses in five languages. The OCW team has distributed over 200 copies of the entire Web site on hard drives primarily to sub-Saharan Africa, where Internet access is limited. OCW has grown into a global educational resource. (via Sara Winge)
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App Inventor and the culture wars

App Inventor and the culture wars

Creativity is what makes life worthwhile, and enabling it is a heroic act. Google has built a culture around enabling others' creativity, and that's worth celebrating. Google's new App Inventor gets to the heart of the cultural difference between Apple and Google. If you haven't seen it yet, App Inventor is an experimental new SDK for the Android platform. What's different about App Inventor is that there's practically no coding per se; it's an entirely visual language.

Comments: 38