The Lean Startup Talk From Web 2.0 Expo

One of our most popular talks at the Web 2.0 Expo SF was Eric Ries’ The Lean Startup: a Disciplined Approach to Imagining, Designing, and Building New Products. I’ve embedded an audio version of his slides above. Eric recommends the talk for people who want to:

  • Identify a profitable business model faster and cheaper than your competitors.
  • Continuously discover what customers want to buy before building or making follow-on investments in new features.
  • Ship new software at a dizzying pace: multiple times a day while improving quality and lowering costs.
  • Build a company-wide culture of decision-making based on real facts, not opinions.

Eric has a follow-up to his talk and more thoughts about Lean Startups on his blog.

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  • The problem is one of form and function. “Web 2.0” software that fits that model is a nearly disjoint subset from “Web 2.0” software that is socially responsible. Effectively, he’s an accidental slave trader. But, the radar mindset has trouble seeing that because in the radar mind-set the purported requirements of big-C capital are the primary engineering constraint and the rest follows from that.

    I say the above and, while it is entirely defensible and even constructive, the capital-chasing instincts behind the rhetoric seem to make it impossible for y’all to talk about. In the bubble around this stuff, critique with a view of social responsibility – if it leads to negative conclusions about financially promising or successful endevors – seems to be considered at least rude and possibly threatening.

    I miss the Enlightenment. That was a nice party while it lasted.

    -t

    p.s., you have a (typically) funny way with the phrase “real facts”.