• Print

Four short links: 31 May 2010

Data and Context, Twitpic Hot or Not, Failing to Save Journalism, Flash in Javascript

  1. Transparency is Not Enough (danah boyd) — we need people to not just have access to the data, but have access to the context surrounding the data. A very thoughtful talk from Gov 2.0 Expo about meaningful data release.
  2. Feed6 — the latest from Rohit Khare is a sort of a “hot or not” for pictures posted to Twitter. Slightly addictive, while somewhat purposeless. Remarkable for how banal the “most popular” pictures are, it reminds me of the way Digg, Reddit, and other such sites trend towards the uninteresting and dissatisfying. Flickr’s interestingness still remains one of the high points of user-curated notability. (via rabble on Twitter)
  3. Potential Policy Recommendations to Support the Reinvention of Journalism (PDF) — FTC staff discussion document that floats a number of policy proposals around journalism: additional IP rights to defend against aggregators like Google News; protection of “hot news” facts; statutory limits to “fair use”; antitrust exemptions for cartel paywalls; and more. Jeff Jarvis hates it, but Alexander Howard found something to love in the proposal that the government “maximize the easy accessibility of government information” to help journalists find and investigate stories more easily. (via Jose Antonio Vargas)
  4. Smokescreen — a Flash player in Javascript. See Simon Willison’s explanation of how it works. Was created by the fantastic Chris Smoak, who was an early Google Maps hacker and built the BusMonster interface to Seattle public transport. (via Simon Willison)
tags: , , , , , , , ,
  • Mother Orwell

    Buried as #3. Like some tiny footnote in history. That’s all you can muster? When your freedom is gone, maybe you won’t care. But you will have left the world a worse place for those who follow.

    George Orwell in Animal Farm taught us about PIGS and how they conspired on the farm to deprive personal liberty.

    At the FCC, the PIGS are alive and well, busily helping themselves to the spoils of individual labor …

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2010/jun/4/ftc-floats-drudge-tax/