Fred Trotter

Fred Trotter works with Open Source Health Information software, things like Electronic Health Records and Health Information Exchange software. Fred believes that good technology in healthcare can reduce medical errors and empower patients.

AI will eventually drive healthcare, but not anytime soon

A merging of artificial intelligence and healthcare is tougher than many realize.

People will eventually get better care from artificial intelligence, but for now, we should keep the algorithms focused on the data that we know is good and keep the doctors focused on the patients.

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The rise of programmable self

The rise of programmable self

Quantifying your changes + motivational hacks = programmable self.

Taking a cue from the Quantified Self movement, the programmable self is the combination of a digital motivation hack with a digital system that tracks behavior. Here's a look at companies and projects relevant to the programmable self space.

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Software crumple zones

It's time to recognize and appreciate highly engineered health information systems.

Clinicians often encounter multi-step software processes that seem laborious. Sometimes that's due to a design flaw, but other times that process has been intentionally constructed as a crumple zone.

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Are EHRs safe?

Electronic health records are fundamentally dangerous. They're also safer than the current model.

As a society, we need to get comfortable with the notion that Electronic Healthcare Records will both help and hurt people. On balance, they will do far more good than harm.

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Epatients: The hackers of the healthcare world

A quick reference for becoming an empowered patient.

The epatient community uses digital tools and the connective power of the Internet to empower patients. Here, Fred Trotter offers epatient resources and first steps.

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The Transportation Security Administration's QR code flub

The Transportation Security Administration's QR code flub

Prank or mistake? A QR code on a TSA poster links to a non-TSA site.

Fred Trotter discovers that a QR code embedded in a TSA poster at the Orlando airport links to justinsomnia.org, which is about as far as you can get from a government website.

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Why developers should enter health IT contests

Developers can make money writing code that makes patients safer.

Working on software that addresses patient safety issues is one of the few ways that a software developer can impact quality of life rather than convenience of life. Health contests are fun enough that you might even forget that you're changing the world.

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Why geeks should care about meaningful use and ACOs

How healthcare data reforms and incentive reforms are connected.

Clinical people tend to focus on meaningful use incentives as "how do I get paid to install an EHR." But geeks can see the bottom line: healthcare reform is pointless unless we get the measurement issue right.

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OSEHRA's first challenge: VistA version control

The VA VistA EHR resists version control systems, which prevents open collaboration.

Veteran Affairs' VistA electronic health record system is famously resistant to being managed by version control. That needs to improve if VistA development is to be run as a meritocracy.

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OSEHRA and the future of VA VistA

Veterans Affairs launches its electronic health record system as an open-source project.

Veterans Affairs is taking the bold step of making governance of the VistA system open source. If you care about healthcare software, the new Open Source Electronic Health Record Agent (OSEHRA) is worth your involvement.

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