Mary Treseler

Mary Treseler is Director of Strategic Content at O'Reilly Media, Inc. She acquires, curates, and edits design content, when not writing about it herself. Most recently Mary created and launched The Lean Series with Eric Ries. She has been working in technology publishing for more than 20 years; her introduction to the design discipline began in 1993 with Jakob Nielsen’s Usability Engineering. A Boston native, Mary lives by the sea in South Dartmouth, MA, with her husband and two Chesapeake Bay Retrievers. When she unplugs, you can find her out wandering with her camera or planning her next culinary adventure.

Big questions, good data, smart designs

Spotify’s Rochelle King on designing with data for optimal user experiences.

The best designers possess empathy for their users — and data is key to gaining this kind of understanding. I recently sat down with Rochelle King, vice president of global design and UX at Spotify, to talk about data, design, and user experience. King stressed the importance of understanding what the numbers in the data mean — and on staying focused on the real endgame:

“​I think a common misconception or misstep that happens is people just look at the numbers and they forget that they’re actually representing human behavior. That’s a dangerous cycle you can fall into — you can start to optimize the numbers for the sake of optimizing numbers rather than thinking about building an experience that helps to craft the best experiences possible. You start to focus on improving numbers rather than on making a great experience​.”

The benefits of data-informed decision-making are clear, but the process is far from easy. Read more…

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Experience design is shaping our future

Design is transforming the way things are to the way they ought to be.

O'Reilly's design exploration is targeting experience design, the Internet of Things and design, and the interplay between design and businessDesign aligns humans and technology, it aligns business and engineering, it aligns digital and physical, and it aligns business needs and user needs. Here at O’Reilly, we’re fascinated by the design space, and we’re launching several initiatives focused on the experience design community.

Design is both the disruptor and being disrupted. It’s disrupting markets, organizations, and relationships, and forcing us to rethink how we live. The discipline of design is also experiencing tremendous growth and change, largely influenced by economic and technology factors. No longer an afterthought, design is now an essential part of a product, and it may even be the most important part of a product’s value. Read more…

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UX Is about Much More than Making Stuff Look Pretty

User-Centered Design with Travis Lowdermilk

Travis Lowdermilk (@tlowdermilk) is a software developer who recently joined Microsoft as UX Designer for Visual Studio. He hosts the Windows Developer Show and advocates for User-Centered Design (UCD). Travis is the author of User-Centered Design: A Developer’s Guide to Building User-Friendly Applications.

Key points from the full video interview include:

  • What is User-Centered Design and why is it important? [Discussed at the 0.16 mark.]
  • How does UCD relate to HCI and UX? [Discussed at the 1.56 mark.]
  • UX helps developers create engaging apps. [Discussed at the 4.34 mark.]
  • Ask questions, observe users, and modify your apps based on what you see and hear. [Discussed at the 07.13 mark.]
  • UCD applies to large and small companies alike. [Discussed at the 9.54 mark.]
  • Users don’t always know what they want. [Discussed at the 13.37 mark.]
  • Engage users even if it’s just a few. [Discussed at the 18.23 mark.]

You can watch the entire interview in the following video:

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The promise of WebGL

Author Tony Parisi on learning WebGL and how it's changing interactive graphics.

WebGL (Web Graphics Library) is a JavaScript API maintained by the Khronos group, a standards body responsible for other open standards including OpenGL.

WebGL allows developers to display hardware-accelerated interactive 3D graphics in the browser without installing additional software — READ: no plug-ins needed. It’s currently supported by most of the major browsers (Chrome, Safari, and Firefox). Though it’s not clear when or if Microsoft will support WebGL, the applications created with WebGL are impressive. Ellie Goulding’s Lights illustrates its power.

Tony Parisi (@auradeluxe), author of WebGL: Up and Running, sat down with me recently to discuss how WebGL is changing the way 3D is developed and displayed on the web. While Flash has long been the dominant tool for developers creating animations, WebGL looks promising. My own take is that if the libraries for WebGL continue to mature I believe WebGL will succeed at becoming the preferred tool of choice for developers.

During our interview Parisi elaborated on the state of WebGL, why he thinks it will succeed and where he sees WebGL being used next. Highlights from our discussion include: Read more…

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