Patrick Reynolds

Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon in six languages

20 years of efficiently computing Bacon numbers

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The Oracle at Delphi spoke just one language, a cryptic one that priests “compiled” into ancient Greek. The Oracle of Bacon—the website that plays the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon game for you—has, in its 20-year existence, been written in six languages. Read on for the history and the reasons why.

1995-1999: C

The original version of the Oracle of Bacon, written by Brett Tjaden in 1995, was all C. The current version, my stewardship of it, and my revision control history only go back to 1999, so that’s where I’ll start. In 1999, I rewrote the Oracle… still entirely in C. Expensive shortest-path and spell-check algorithms? Definitely in C. String processing to build the database? Also C! Presentation layer to parse CGI parameters and generate HTML? C here, too!

Why C? The rationale for the algorithmic component was straightforward: the Oracle of Bacon ran on a slow, shared Unix machine that other people were using to get actual work done. Minimizing CPU and memory resource requirements was the polite thing to do. I needed a compiled language that let me optimize time and space extensively. The loops all counted down, not up, because comparing against zero was fractionally faster on SPARC. It had to be C.

But why were the offline string processing and the CGIs in C? Mostly, I think, to reuse code from the other parts of the code base and from previous projects I’d written when C was the only language I knew.

2004-2005: Perl

As the site added features, I got tired of writing code to generate HTML in C. I wrote new CGIs, then rewrote existing CGIs, in Perl. Simply put, writing the CGIs in an interpreted language made me more productive. I had hash tables and vectors built into the language and CGI support a simple “use” statement away. I didn’t have to compile on one server and then deploy to another—I could edit the CGIs right there on the web server. Good deployment practices it wasn’t, but it made me more productive as a programmer, and the performance of the CGIs didn’t matter all that much.

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