ENTRIES TAGGED "apache"

Four short links: 7 June 2013

Four short links: 7 June 2013

Open Source BigTable, Robots Lost, Changing the World, Secrecy Binge

  1. Accumulo — NSA’s BigTable implementation, released as an Apache project.
  2. How the Robots Lost (Business Week) — the decline of high-frequency trading profits (basically, markets worked and imbalances in speed and knowledge have been corrected). Notable for the regulators getting access to the technology that the traders had: Last fall the SEC said it would pay Tradeworx, a high-frequency trading firm, $2.5 million to use its data collection system as the basic platform for a new surveillance operation. Code-named Midas (Market Information Data Analytics System), it scours the market for data from all 13 public exchanges. Midas went live in February. The SEC can now detect anomalous situations in the market, such as a trader spamming an exchange with thousands of fake orders, before they show up on blogs like Nanex and ZeroHedge. If Midas sees something odd, Berman’s team can look at trading data on a deeper level, millisecond by millisecond.
  3. PRISM: Surprised? (Danny O’Brien) — I really don’t agree with the people who think “We don’t have the collective will”, as though there’s some magical way things got done in the past when everyone was in accord and surprised all the time. It’s always hard work to change the world. Endless, dull hard work. Ten years later, when you’ve freed the slaves or beat the Nazis everyone is like “WHY CAN’T IT BE AS EASY TO CHANGE THIS AS THAT WAS, BACK IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS. I GUESS WE’RE ALL JUST SHEEPLE THESE DAYS.”
  4. What We Don’t Know About Spying on Citizens is Scarier Than What We Do Know (Bruce Schneier) — The U.S. government is on a secrecy binge. It overclassifies more information than ever. And we learn, again and again, that our government regularly classifies things not because they need to be secret, but because their release would be embarrassing. Open source BigTable implementation: free. Data gathering operation around it: $20M/year. Irony in having the extent of authoritarian Big Brother government secrecy questioned just as a whistleblower’s military trial is held “off the record”: priceless.
Comment |

Open source community collaboration strategies for the enterprise

Key open source considerations for businesses, communities and developers.

OSCON’s theme last year was “from disruption to default.” Over the last decade, we’ve seen open source shift from the shadows to the limelight. Today, more businesses than ever are considering the role of open source in their strategies. I’ve had the chance to watch and participate in the transitions of numerous businesses and business units to using…
Read Full Post | Comment |
Four short links: 25 April 2012

Four short links: 25 April 2012

Online Courses, mod_spdy, Dying Industries, and Javascript Conference Report

  1. World History Since 1300 (Coursera) — Coursera expands offerings to include humanities. This content is in books and already in online lectures in many formats. What do you get from these? Online quizzes and the online forum with similar people considering similar things. So it’s a book club for a university course?
  2. mod_spdy — Apache module for the SPDY protocol, Google’s “faster than HTTP” HTTP.
  3. The Top 10 Dying Industries in the United States (Washington Post) — between the Internet and China, yesterday’s cash cows are today’s casseroles.
  4. Notes from JSConf2012 — excellent conference report: covers what happens, why it was interesting or not, and even summarizes relevant and interesting hallway conversations. AA++ would attend by proxy again. (via an old Javascript Weekly)
Comment: 1 |

Why Hadoop caught on

Doug Cutting on Hadoop's rise and why he's surprised at its growth.

Doug Cutting discusses Hadoop's current and near-term role, and the factors that made it a central part of data processing.

Read Full Post | Comments Off |
Developer Week in Review: Christmas in July for Apache

Developer Week in Review: Christmas in July for Apache

Apache adds to their donated portfolio and your travel-patent guide to East Texas.

In the latest Developer Week in Review: Apache gets a gift of code from IBM, and a handy patent / travel guide for your next trip to East Texas.

Read Full Post | Comment |
The Java parade: What about IBM and Apache?

The Java parade: What about IBM and Apache?

It's unlikely IBM or Apache will lead the Java community.

Why did Mike Loukides leave IBM and Apache out of his recent piece, “Who leads the Java Parade?” Because — despite good reasons — they both opted out.

Read Full Post | Comments: 2 |
Developer Week in Review: The other shoe drops on iOS developers

Developer Week in Review: The other shoe drops on iOS developers

iPhone devs may need lawyers, Apache gets a new project, and Java programmers abuse a pattern

If you were an iOS developer, you may have gotten to meet a process server in person this week, as Lodsys doles out the first batch of lawsuits. Oracle gave Apache the keys to OpenOffice, and told them to take it out for a spin, and your faithful editor vents about a commonly overused Java pattern.

Read Full Post | Comments: 2 |
Four short links: 31 March 2011

Four short links: 31 March 2011

Historic Debt, Historic Naming, Autonomous Quadcopter, and Entrepreneurial Thought

  1. Debt: The First 5,000 YearsThroughout its 5000 year history, debt has always involved institutions – whether Mesopotamian sacred kingship, Mosaic jubilees, Sharia or Canon Law – that place controls on debt’s potentially catastrophic social consequences. It is only in the current era, writes anthropologist David Graeber, that we have begun to see the creation of the first effective planetary administrative system largely in order to protect the interests of creditors. (via Tim O’Reilly)
  2. Know Your History — where Google’s +1 came from (answer: Apache project).
  3. MIT Autonomous QuadcopterMIT drone makes a map of a room in real time using an X Box Kinect and is able to navigate through it. All calculations performed on board the multicopter. Wow. (via Slashdot and Sara Winge)
  4. How Great Entrepreneurs Think — leaving aside the sloppy open-mouth kisses to startups that “great entrepreneurs” implies, an interesting article comparing the mindsets of corporate execs with entrepreneurs. I’d love to read the full interviews and research paper. Sarasvathy explains that entrepreneurs’ aversion to market research is symptomatic of a larger lesson they have learned: They do not believe in prediction of any kind. “If you give them data that has to do with the future, they just dismiss it,” she says. “They don’t believe the future is predictable…or they don’t want to be in a space that is very predictable.” [...] the careful forecast is the enemy of the fortuitous surprise. (via Sacha Judd)
Comments Off |
Developer Week in Review

Developer Week in Review

Tomcat purrs, Amazon dictates, and HTML5 brands

In this edition of Developer Week in Review: there's a new Tomcat in town; Amazon sets app prices; and HTML5 may be a work in progress, but now it's got a logo.

Read Full Post | Comments Off |

Developer Week in Review

Intel opens an app store, Apache fumes over Java, old software Microsoft should open source, Apple updates on the way

In this edition of Developer Week in Review: Intel opens an app store, Apache is peeved at Oracle, Microsoft open sources a language you've probably never heard of, and Radar detects an incoming salvo of point-releases from Apple.

Read Full Post | Comments: 2 |