"Big Data" entries

Let’s build open source tensor libraries for data science

Tensor methods for machine learning are fast, accurate, and scalable, but we'll need well-developed libraries.

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Data scientists frequently find themselves dealing with high-dimensional feature spaces. As an example, text mining usually involves vocabularies comprised of 10,000+ different words. Many analytic problems involve linear algebra, particularly 2D matrix factorization techniques, for which several open source implementations are available. Anyone working on implementing machine learning algorithms ends up needing a good library for matrix analysis and operations.

But why stop at 2D representations? In a recent Strata + Hadoop World San Jose presentation, UC Irvine professor Anima Anandkumar described how techniques developed for higher-dimensional arrays can be applied to machine learning. Tensors are generalizations of matrices that let you look beyond pairwise relationships to higher-dimensional models (a matrix is a second-order tensor). For instance, one can examine patterns between any three (or more) dimensions in data sets. In a text mining application, this leads to models that incorporate the co-occurrence of three or more words, and in social networks, you can use tensors to encode arbitrary degrees of influence (e.g., “friend of friend of friend” of a user).

Being able to capture higher-order relationships proves to be quite useful. In her talk, Anandkumar described applications to latent variable models — including text mining (topic models), information science (social network analysis), recommender systems, and deep neural networks. A natural entry point for applications is to look at generalizations of matrix (2D) techniques to higher-dimensional arrays. Read more…

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Big data’s impact on global agriculture

The O'Reilly Radar Podcast: Stewart Collis talks about making precision farming accessible and affordable for all farmers.

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Stewart Collis, CTO and co-founder of AWhere, recently tweeted a link to a video by the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment, Big Question: Feast or Famine? The video highlights the increasing complexity of feeding our rapidly growing population, and Collis noted its relation to his work at AWhere. I recently caught up with Collis to talk about our current global agriculture situation, the impact of big data on agriculture, and the work his company is doing to help address global agriculture problems.

The challenge, explained Collis, is two-fold: our growing population — expected to increase by another 2.4 billion people by 2050, and the increasing weather variability affecting our growing seasons and farmers’ abilities to produce and scale to accommodate that population. “In the face of weather variability, climate change, and increasing temperatures … farmers no longer know when it’s going to rain,” he said, and then noted: “There’s only 34 growing seasons between now and [2050], so this is a problem we need to solve now.”

Read more…

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Four short links: 13 March 2015

Four short links: 13 March 2015

Sad Sysadminning, Data Workflow, Ambiguous "Database," and Creepy Barbie

  1. The Sad State of Sysadmin in the Age of Containers (Erich Schubert) — a Grumpy Old Man rant, but solid. And since nobody is still able to compile things from scratch, everybody just downloads precompiled binaries from random websites. Often without any authentication or signature.
  2. Pinball — Pinterest open-sourced their data workflow manager.
  3. Disambiguating Databases (ACM) — The scope of the term database is vast. Technically speaking, anything that stores data for later retrieval is a database. Even by that broad definition, there is functionality that is common to most databases. This article enumerates those features at a high level. The intent is to provide readers with a toolset with which they might evaluate databases on their relative merits.
  4. Hello Barbie — I just can’t imagine a business not wanting to mine and repurpose the streams of audio data coming into their servers. “You listen to Katy Perry a lot. So do I! You have a birthday coming up. Have you told your parents about the Katy Perry brand official action figurines from Mattel? Kids love ’em, and demo data and representative testing indicates you will, too!” Or just offer a subscription service where parents can listen in on what their kids say when they play in the other room with their friends. Or identify product mentions and cross-market offline. Or …
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Navigating the Hadoop ecosystem

A field guide to the Apache Hadoop projects, subprojects, and related technologies.

Marshall Presser, co-author of Field Guide to Hadoop, contributed to this post.

IT managers, developers, data analysts, and system architects are encountering the largest and most disruptive change in data analysis since the ascendency of the relational database in early 1980s — the challenge to process, organize, and take full advantage of big data.  With 73% of organizations making big data investments in 2014 and 2015, this transition is occurring at a historic pace, requiring new ways of thinking to go along with new tools and techniques.

Hadoop is the cornerstone of this change to a landscape of systems and skills we’ve traditionally possessed. In the nine short years since the project revolutionized data science at Yahoo!, an entire ecosystem of technologies has sprung up around it. While the power of this ecosystem is plain to see, it can be a challenge to navigate your way through the complex and rapidly evolving collection of projects and products.

A couple years ago, my coworker Marshall Presser and I started our journey into the world of Hadoop. Like many folks, we found the company we worked for was making a major investment in the Hadoop ecosystem, and we had to find a way to adapt. We started in all of the typical places — blog posts, trade publications, Wikipedia articles, and project documentation. Quickly, we learned that many of these sources are often highly biased, either too shallow or too deep, and just plain inconsistent. Read more…

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Marshal your data with entity resolution

Analytics can make combining or comparing data faster and less painful.

Entity_Resolution_webcastEntity resolution refers to processes that businesses and other organizations have to do all the time in order to produce full reports on people, organizations, or events. Entity resolution can be used, for instance, to:

  • Combine your customer data with a list purchased from a data broker. Identical data may be in columns of different names, such as “last” and “surname.” Connecting columns from different databases is a common extract, transform, and load (ETL) task.
  • Extract values from one database and match them against one or more columns in another. For instance, if you get a party list, you might want to find your clients among the attendees. A police detective might want to extract the names of people involved in a crime report and see whether any suspects are among them.
  • Find a match in dirty data, such as a person whose name is spelled differently in different rows.

Dirty, inconsistent, or unstructured data is the chief challenge in entity resolution. Jenn Reed, director of product management for Novetta Entity Analytics, points out that it’s easy for two numbers to get switched, such as a person’s driver’s license and social security numbers. Over time, sophisticated rules have been created to compare data, and it often requires the comparison of several fields to make sure a match is correct. (For instance, health information exchanges use up to 17 different types of data to make sure the Marcia Marquez who just got admitted to the ER is the same Marcia Marquez who visited her doctor last week.) Read more…

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Turning Ph.D.s into industrial data scientists and data engineers

The O'Reilly Data Show Podcast: Angie Ma on building a finishing school for science and engineering doctorates.

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Editor’s note: The ASI will offer a two-day intensive course, Practical Machine Learning, at Strata + Hadoop World in London in May.

Back when I was considering leaving academia, the popular exit route was financial engineering. Many science and engineering Ph.D.s ended up in big Wall Street banks; I chose to be the lead quant at a small hedge fund — it was a natural choice for many of us. Financial engineering was topically close to my academic interests, and working with traders meant access to resources and interesting problems.

Today, there are many more options for people with science and engineering doctorates. A few organizations take science and engineering Ph.D.s, and over the course of 8-12 weeks, prepare them to join the ranks of industrial data scientists and data engineers.

I recently sat down with Angie Ma, co-founder and president of ASI, a London startup that runs a carefully structured “finishing school” for science and engineering doctorates. We talked about how Angie and her co-founders (all ex-physicists) arrived at the concept of the ASI, the structure of their training programs, and the data and startup scene in the UK. [Full disclosure: I’m an advisor to the ASI.] Read more…

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Four short links: 5 March 2015

Four short links: 5 March 2015

Web Grain, Cognition and Computation, New Smart Watch, and Assessing Accuracy

  1. The Web’s Grain (Frank Chimero) — What would happen if we stopped treating the web like a blank canvas to paint on, and instead like a material to build with?
  2. Bruce Sterling on Convergence of Humans and MachinesI like to use the terms “cognition” and “computation”. Cognition is something that happens in brains, physical, biological brains. Computation is a thing that happens with software strings on electronic tracks that are inscribed out of silicon and put on fibre board. They are not the same thing, and saying that makes the same mistake as in earlier times, when people said that human thought was like a steam engine.
  3. Smart Pocket Watch — I love to see people trying different design experiences. This is beautiful. And built on Firefox OS!
  4. Knowledge-Based Trust (PDF) — Google research paper on how to assess factual accuracy of web page content. It was bad enough when Google incentivised people to make content-free pages. Next there’ll be a reward for scamming bogus facts into Google’s facts database.
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Year Zero: Our life timelines begin

In the next decade, Year Zero will be how big data reaches everyone and will fundamentally change how we live.

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Editor’s note: this post originally appeared on the author’s blog, Solve for Interesting. This lightly edited version is reprinted here with permission.

In 10 years, every human connected to the Internet will have a timeline. It will contain everything we’ve done since we started recording, and it will be the primary tool with which we administer our lives. This will fundamentally change how we live, love, work, and play. And we’ll look back at the time before our feed started — before Year Zero — as a huge, unknowable black hole.

This timeline — beginning for newborns at Year Zero — will be so intrinsic to life that it will quickly be taken for granted. Those without a timeline will be at a huge disadvantage. Those with a good one will have the tricks of a modern mentalist: perfect recall, suggestions for how to curry favor, ease maintaining friendships and influencing strangers, unthinkably higher Dunbar numbers — now, every interaction has a history.

This isn’t just about lifelogging health data, like your Fitbit or Jawbone. It isn’t about financial data, like Mint. It isn’t just your social graph or photo feed. It isn’t about commuting data like Waze or Maps. It’s about all of these, together, along with the tools and user interfaces and agents to make sense of it.

Every decade or so, something from military or enterprise technology finds its way, bent and twisted, into the mass market. The client-server computer gave us the PC; wide-area networks gave us the consumer web; pagers and cell phones gave us mobile devices. In the next decade, Year Zero will be how big data reaches everyone. Read more…

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Four short links: 3 March 2015

Four short links: 3 March 2015

Wearable Warning, Time Series Data, App Cards, and Secure Comms

  1. You Guys Realize the Apple Watch is Going to Flop, Right? — leaving aside the “guys” assumption of its readers, you can take this either as a list of the challenges Apple will inevitably overcome or bypass when they release their watch, or (as intended) a list of the many reasons that it’s too damn soon for watches to be useful. The Apple Watch is Jonathan Ive’s new Newton. It’s a potentially promising form that’s being built about 10 years before Apple has the technology or infrastructure to pull it off in a meaningful way. As a result, the novel interactions that could have made the Apple watch a must-have device aren’t in the company’s launch product, nor are they on the immediate horizon. And all Apple can sell the public on is a few tweets and emails on their wrists—an attempt at a fashion statement that needs to be charged once or more a day.
  2. InfluxDB, Now With Tags and More UnicornsThe combination of these new features [tagging, and the use of tags in queries] makes InfluxDB not just a time series database, but also a database for time series discovery. It’s our solution for making the problem of dealing with hundreds of thousands or millions of time series tractable.
  3. The End of Apps as We Know ThemIt may be very likely that the primary interface for interacting with apps will not be the app itself. The app is primarily a publishing tool. The number one way people use your app is through this notification layer, or aggregated card stream. Not by opening the app itself. To which one grumpy O’Reilly editor replied, “cards are the new walled garden.”
  4. Signal 2.0Signal uses your existing phone number and address book. There are no separate logins, usernames, passwords, or PINs to manage or lose. We cannot hear your conversations or see your messages, and no one else can either. Everything in Signal is always end-to-end encrypted, and painstakingly engineered in order to keep your communication safe.
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Four short links: 2 March 2015

Four short links: 2 March 2015

Onboarding UX, Productivity Vision, Bad ML, and Lifelong Learning

  1. User Onboarding Teardowns — the UX of new users. (via Andy Baio)
  2. Microsoft’s Productivity Vision — always-on thinged-up Internet everywhere, with predictions and magic by the dozen.
  3. Machine Learning Done WrongWhen dealing with small amounts of data, it’s reasonable to try as many algorithms as possible and to pick the best one since the cost of experimentation is low. But as we hit “big data,” it pays off to analyze the data upfront and then design the modeling pipeline (pre-processing, modeling, optimization algorithm, evaluation, productionization) accordingly.
  4. Ten Simple Rules for Lifelong Learning According to Richard Hamming (PLoScompBio) — Exponential growth of the amount of knowledge is a central feature of the modern era. As Hamming points out, since the time of Isaac Newton (1642/3-1726/7), the total amount of knowledge (including but not limited to technical fields) has doubled about every 17 years. At the same time, the half-life of technical knowledge has been estimated to be about 15 years. If the total amount of knowledge available today is x, then in 15 years the total amount of knowledge can be expected to be nearly 2x, while the amount of knowledge that has become obsolete will be about 0.5x. This means that the total amount of knowledge thought to be valid has increased from x to nearly 1.5x. Taken together, this means that if your daughter or son was born when you were 34 years old, the amount of knowledge she or he will be faced with on entering university at age 17 will be more than twice the amount you faced when you started college.
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