ENTRIES TAGGED "nosql"

Returning transactions to distributed data stores

Principles for the next generation of NoSQL databases

By David Rosenthal and Stephen Pimentel

Rise of NoSQL

Database technologies are undergoing rapid evolution, with new approaches being actively explored after decades of relative stability. As late as 2008, the term “NoSQL”  barely existed and relational databases were both commercially dominant and entrenched in the developer community. Since then NoSQL systems have rapidly gained prominence and early systems such as Google’s Bigtable and Amazon’s Dynamo have inspired dozens of new databases (HBase, Cassandra, Voldemort, MongoDB, etc.) that fall under the NoSQL umbrella.

The first generation of NoSQL databases aimed to achieve the dual goals of fault tolerance and horizontal scalability on clusters of commodity hardware There are now a variety of NoSQL systems available that, at their best, achieve these goals. Unfortunately, the cost for these benefits is high: limited data model flexibility and extensibility, and weak guarantees for applications due to the lack of multi-statement (global) transactions.

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Four short links: 1 March 2013

Four short links: 1 March 2013

Drone Journalism, DNS Sniffing, E-Book Lending, and Structured Data Server

  1. Drone Journalismtwo universities in the US have already incorporated drone use in their journalism programs. The Drone Journalism Lab at the University of Nebraska and the Missouri Drone Journalism Program at the University of Missouri both teach journalism students how to make the most of what drones have to offer when reporting a story. They also teach students how to fly drones, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations and ethics.
  2. passivednsA network sniffer that logs all DNS server replies for use in a passive DNS setup.
  3. IFLA E-Lending Background Paper (PDF) — The global dominance of English language eBook title availability reinforced by eReader availability is starkly evident in the statistics on titles available by country: in the USA: 1,000,000; UK: 400,000; Germany/France: 80,000 each; Japan: 50,000; Australia: 35,000; Italy: 20,000; Spain: 15,000; Brazil: 6,000. Many more stats in this paper prepared as context for the International Federation of Library Associations.
  4. The god Architecturea scalable, performant, persistent, in-memory data structure server. It allows massively distributed applications to update and fetch common data in a structured and sorted format. Its main inspirations are Redis and Chord/DHash. Like Redis it focuses on performance, ease of use and a small, simple yet powerful feature set, while from the Chord/DHash projects it inherits scalability, redundancy, and transparent failover behaviour.
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Four short links: 15 June 2012

Four short links: 15 June 2012

On Anonymous, Graph Database, Leap Second, and Debugging Creativity

  1. In Flawed, Epic Anonymous Book, the Abyss Gazes Back (Wired) — Quinn Norton’s review of a book about Anonymous is an excellent introduction to Anonymous. Anonymous made us, its mediafags, masters of hedging language. The bombastic claims and hyperbolic declarations must be reported from their mouths, not from our publications. And yet still we make mistakes and publish lies and assumptions that slip through. There is some of this in all of journalism, but in a world where nothing is true and everything is permitted, it’s a constant existential slog. It’s why there’s not many of us on this beat.
  2. Titan (GitHub) — Apache2-licensed distributed graph database optimized for storing and processing large-scale graphs within a multi-machine cluster. Cassandra and HBase backends, implements the Blueprints graph API. (via Hacker News)
  3. Extra Second This June — we’re getting a leap second this year: there’ll be 2012 June 30, 23h 59m 60s. Calendars are fun.
  4. On Creativity (Beta Knowledge) — I wanted to create a game where even the developers couldn’t see what was coming. Of course I wasn’t thinking about debugging at this point. The people who did the debugging asked me what was a bug. I could not answer that. — Keita Takahashi, game designer (Katamari Damacy, Noby Noby Boy). Awesome quote.
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MySQL in 2012: Report from Percona Live

Checking in on the state of MySQL.

Contrasting deployments at craigslit and Pinterest, trends, commercial offerings, and more

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Data’s next steps

RedMonk's Steve O'Grady weighs in on data's pressing issues.

Redmonk analyst Steve O'Grady discusses the demand for data scientists, the problem of using data to asking the right questions, and why you shouldn't rush into a NoSQL investment.

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Data's next steps

RedMonk's Steve O'Grady weighs in on data's pressing issues.

Redmonk analyst Steve O'Grady discusses the demand for data scientists, the problem of using data to asking the right questions, and why you shouldn't rush into a NoSQL investment.

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Top stories: February 6-10, 2012

Top stories: February 6-10, 2012

The NoSQL movement, a victory for the web, and it's time to end DRM and embrace a unified ebook format.

This week on O'Reilly: Mike Loukides surveyed the NoSQL database landscape, the open web scored an important victory in court, and Joe Wikert said it's time to embrace a unified ebook format and abandon DRM.

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The NoSQL movement

The NoSQL movement

How to think about choosing a database.

A relational database is no longer the default choice. Mike Loukides charts the rise of the NoSQL movement and explains how to choose the right database for your application.

Comments: 12
Developer Week in Review: Talking to your phone

Developer Week in Review: Talking to your phone

Getting serious about Siri, Open Office on the rocks, and Google embraces SQL.

This week, we ask if Apple's Siri has more than novelty value, and decide it does. Open Office needs you (or at least your money) to stay afloat, and Google bends to developer pressure and finally adds SQL support to its cloud computing platform.

Comments: 4
Top Stories: October 3-7, 2011

Top Stories: October 3-7, 2011

Why Oracle's big data move matters, inside PhoneGap, and data drives NYC's quest to become a premiere digital city.

This week on O'Reilly: Edd Dumbill explained why Oracle's Big Data Appliance is both a validation and a sign of battles to come, we dug into PhoneGap's cross-platform app capabilities, and we surveyed New York City's data and open government efforts.

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