ENTRIES TAGGED "piracy"

Five things we learned about publishing in 2011

Five things we learned about publishing in 2011

Lessons from Amazon, self-publishing, ereading studies, HTML5 and DRM.

It was a busy and sometimes bruising year for publishing as the industry continued its digital transformation. Here, we take a look at five of the biggest lessons from 2011.

Comments: 10
Publishing News: Early response to the Kindle Lending Library

Publishing News: Early response to the Kindle Lending Library

Amazon launched its Kindle Lending Library, and a publisher goes after BitTorrent users.

Amazon Prime became even more pervasive with the Kindle Lending Library, the publishing industry joined the piracy lawsuit fray, and presentation videos from the Books in Browsers conference are now available.

Comment: 1
Four short links: 26 April 2011

Four short links: 26 April 2011

Android Nook, Market Failure, Social Spread Analysis, and Chinese eBooks

  1. Barnes and Noble Nook Color Gets Android Upgrade (Wired) — was an e-reader, but now Barnes and Noble are offering an upgrade to turn it into a fully-fledged Android tablet. The only thing you won’t be able to do is download apps from the Google marketplace. The Nook retails for $250. (via Glyn Moody)
  2. Anime Site Treats Piracy as Market Failure (Ars Technica) — “In almost all cases, piracy is not an issue of legality,” says Kun Gao, CEO of the anime streaming site Crunchyroll. It’s often a market issue—and Crunchyroll turns a profit by offering anime lovers what they want: legal access to anime shows right after new episodes have aired in Japan. [...] Kun claims that piracy drops “60 to 70 percent” for shows carried by Crunchyroll. (via Glyn Moody)
  3. Project Cascade — New York Times project analyzing tweets, retweets, bit.ly uses, and other events in the online lifecycle of stories. Built using Processing and MongoDB. (via Flowing Data)
  4. Survey Indicates e-book Boom in China (Xinhua) — estimates of 613M ebooks read, 23% on mobile phones. Contains the sobering the acceptable price to download an e-book from the Internet is 1.33 yuan (0.2 U.S. dollars), and nearly 54 percent of digital readers say they would pay an average of 3.45 yuan to download e-books. (via Tim O’Reilly)
Comment: 1
Getting your book in front of 160 million users is usually a good thing

Getting your book in front of 160 million users is usually a good thing

"Pirate's Dilemma" author Matt Mason on BitTorrent.

Pirating your own book may seem like an odd promotion strategy, but that's just what Megan Lisa Jones did with her new novel. Matt Mason, author of "The Pirate's Dilemma," says P2P platforms like BitTorrent are a great way to reach audiences and distribute content.

Comments: 8
Publishing News: Week in Review

Publishing News: Week in Review

NPR for ebooks, piracy as a promotional tool, and how and when book trailers work.

In the latest Publishing News: Gluejar wants to apply a public broadcasting model to ebooks, Megan Lisa Jones "pirated" her own book, and Quirk Books VP Brett Cohen discusses the intricacies of book trailers.

Comment: 1
Publishing News: Week in Review

Publishing News: Week in Review

Margaret Atwood isn't sold on merchandise, piracy isn't all about price, and a Lonely Planet app ditches the book

In the latest Publishing News: Merchandising will not save publishing, but Margaret Atwood made T-shirts anyway; Facebook's comment plugin reduces comments, but maybe for the better; piracy isn't just about price; and Lonely Planet moved beyond the book..

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Four short links: 17 March 2011

Four short links: 17 March 2011

Data Manual, Data Processing, Piracy Report, and Fragile Free

  1. The Open Data Manual — a HOWTO for organisations wanting to open up data. This report discusses legal, social and technical aspects of open data. The manual can be used by anyone but is especially designed for those seeking to open up data. It discusses the why, what and how of open data — why to go open, what open is, and the how to ‘open’ data.
  2. MDP — Modular Toolkit for Data-Processing. Open source Python toolkit embodying a pile of machine learning and signal processing algorithms. (via Joshua Schachter)
  3. Media Piracy in Emerging Economies — SSRC report. The study finds no systematic links between media piracy and organized crime or terrorism in any of the countries examined. Today, commercial pirates and transnational smugglers face the same dilemma as the legal industry: how to compete with free. (via BoingBoing)
  4. The Fragility of Free (Ben Brooks) — The fragility of free is a catchy term that describes what happens when the free money runs out. Or—perhaps more accurately—when the investors/founders/venture capitalists run out of cash, or patience, or both. Because at some point Twitter and all other companies have to make the move from ‘charity’ to ‘business’—or, put another way, they have to make the move from spending tons of money to making slightly more money than they spend. It’s at this moment that we begin to see the fragilities of the free system. Things that never had ads, get ads—things that were free, now cost a monthly fee. We have all seen it before with hundreds of services—many of which are no longer around. (via Marco Arment)
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Piracy isn't just about price

Piracy isn't just about price

A piracy research report makes a strong point about pricing, but results may be too narrow.

The "Media Piracy in Emerging Economies" report offers good insight about the realities of pricing, but the "Don't Make Me Steal" manifesto offers a broader perspective on why people pirate digital content.

Comments: 6
Four short links: 28 February 2011

Four short links: 28 February 2011

Culture, Wifi, Emotion, and Piracy

  1. Making or Breaking Culture — I’d never thought of HR as something that requires courage, but these stories clearly illustrate that if you want to put your people first then you must do so when it would be easier to buckle. (via Richard Hulse on Twitter)
  2. Lightpainting Wifi Signal Strength in Urban Neighbourhoods (Vimeo) — I’m a junkie for concept videos of exhibitionist information like this. (via Courtney Johnston’s Instapaper Feed)
  3. What Makes a Great Speech? (Guardian) — my quest to understand how software can be passionate, opinionated, quirky, persuasive, and generally bypass reason and shoot straight for our emotional pattern-matching apparatus means that I end up reading articles like this. (via Courtney Johnston’s Instapaper Feed as well)
  4. Piracy is the Future of Television (PDF) — paper that plainly lays out just how much better an experience it is to be pirating your TV than watching it.
Comment: 1