ENTRIES TAGGED "startup"

MagAppZine's goal: From PDF to app in about 15 minutes

MagAppZine's goal: From PDF to app in about 15 minutes

MagAppZine looks to make mobile app creation easier for publishers.

The next TOC Sneak Peek webcast will feature Paul Canetti, founder of MagAppZine, a platform that allows publishers to create custom apps. Here, Canetti talks about starting the company and the benefits he sees for publishers.

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Four short links: 16 August 2011

Four short links: 16 August 2011

Doctorovian Keynote, Bagcheck Tech, Render Webpages, and Science Reading

  1. Cory Doctorow’s SIGGRAPH Keynote (BoingBoing) — the latest from Cory on reforming copyright.
  2. Bagcheck Technology — great list of services and systems used by the Bagcheck folks.
  3. Berkelium — library to render webpages via Google’s Chromium web browser. (via Joshua Schachter)
  4. Sci Foo Reading List — Edd Dumbill shared his reading list from Science Foo Camp.
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What publishing can learn from tech startups

What publishing can learn from tech startups

Todd Sattersten on how a startup mentality applies to the publishing world.

Author Todd Sattersten believes the publishing industry has a lot to learn from tech startups. Agile development, iteration and adaptation all have a place.

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Support vs Access: Why Highlighter picked Seattle

Support vs Access: Why Highlighter picked Seattle

A new tech-publishing startup chose Seattle over New York or Silicon Valley.

Seattle is where it's at, at least for the recently launched annotation application Highlighter. Co-founder and CEO Josh Mullineaux talks about the company, where it's headed, and why Seattle is home.

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Creating the ideal conditions for tech startups

European tech entrepreneurs have concerns about startup environments.

Creating economic conditions that are beneficial to startups is increasingly important for governments. What are the factors that will attract and retain top talent?

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Four short links: 30 June 2011

Four short links: 30 June 2011

Buying a Micro, Education Entrepreneurship, Faceted Search, Vector-Graphics Scripting

  1. Electric Dreams – The 1980s ‘The Micro Home Computer Of 1982′ (YouTube) — from a reality show where a gadget-using family are forced to relive 30 years of technology invention, one year each day. This clip is where they’re forced to choose a microcomputer from the rush of early hobbyist machines in the 80s: Spectrum, Dragon-32, etc. (via Skud)
  2. K-12 Entrepreneurship: Slow Entry, Distant Exit (PDF) — paper (from the set I pointed to yesterday) laying out in start terms the difficulty of educational entrepreneurship. Keeping the lights on and a teacher in every classroom consumes most of the annual money spent on education so that little is left over to generate or try new tools, techniques or approaches. Out of every dollar spent on education in 2005, only 3.5 cents was spent on materials, tools and services. Subtract the big mandatory purchases of textbooks and annual testing, and one is left with almost no free funds to deploy creatively. With class size reduction and teacher incentive pay ramping up around the country, the pressure on these budget lines continues to increase, reducing the dollars available for investment in breakthrough tools and services.
  3. VisualSearch.js — MIT-licensed open-source JavaScript library for augmenting search-boxes with facets and values. (via DocumentCloud Blog)
  4. Here Be Dragons (Bryan O’Sullivan) — the thorny problem of printing floating point numbers. Prior to Steele and White’s “How to print floating-point numbers accurately”, implementations of printf and similar rendering functions did their best to render floating point numbers, but there was wide variation in how well they behaved. A number such as 1.3 might be rendered as 1.29999999, for instance, or if a number was put through a feedback loop of being written out and its written representation read back, each successive result could drift further and further away from the original.
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Four short links: 16 June 2011

Four short links: 16 June 2011

Solar Wireless Sensors, CSS Lint, Options Explained, and Web Hacks

  1. Solar Powered Wireless Sensor NetworkChris is building wireless sensor networks using open source software and hardware that could be used in a variety of applications like air quality or home energy monitoring. It looks like he was inspired by Tweetawatt and is using xBee and ASUS wifi for communication in conjunction with Pachube for data display. (via MindKits)
  2. CSS Lint — validate and quality check your CSS. (via Jacine Luisi)
  3. An Introduction to Stock Options for the Tech Entrepreneur or Startup Employee (Scribd) — nice introduction to board, stock, options, finance, dilution, and more.
  4. Interesting Web Hacks (Quora) — You can quickly run HTML in the browser without creating a HTML file: Enter this in the address bar: data:text/html,<h1>Hello, world!<h1> (via Alex Gibson)
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Four short links: 1 June 2011

Four short links: 1 June 2011

Fair Use, Equation UI, Startup Numbers, and Data Search Engine

  1. Putting Fair Use Forward (Chronicle of Higher Education) — lawyer and academic collaborating on guidelines for academic fair use, intended to remove the chilling effect of the fear of being sued. Great quotes: People deal with fuzzy laws all the time, she argues. “Obscenity is impossible to define, and yet people have some idea of when they’re committing an obscenity or not. You could walk through your life being haunted by the specter of litigation in every aspect of it. But people don’t usually do this in their other free-speech rights.” (via David Adler)
  2. Scrubbing Calculator — clever UI for solving equations without needing to know how to solve equations. Imminent death of mathematics skill in the US predicted, film at 11. (via Dan Meyer)
  3. Startup Genome — a report, written from research into 650 startups. Investors who provide hands-on help have little or no effect on the company’s operational performance. But the right mentors significantly influence a company’s performance and ability to raise money. (However, this does not mean that investors don’t have a significant effect on valuations and M&A) Balanced teams with one technical founder and one business founder raise 30% more money, have 2.9x more user growth and are 19% less likely to scale prematurely than technical or business-heavy founding teams.
  4. Zanran — search engine for graphs, charts, and data. (via Pia Waugh)
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Improving the landscape for organic startups

A congressional committee will hear a "crowdfunding exemption" proposal next week.

Next week, Sherwood Neiss will testify in favor of a small offerings exemption for investments, which could spark a revolution in grassroots entrepreneurship.

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Four short links: 31 March 2011

Four short links: 31 March 2011

Historic Debt, Historic Naming, Autonomous Quadcopter, and Entrepreneurial Thought

  1. Debt: The First 5,000 YearsThroughout its 5000 year history, debt has always involved institutions – whether Mesopotamian sacred kingship, Mosaic jubilees, Sharia or Canon Law – that place controls on debt’s potentially catastrophic social consequences. It is only in the current era, writes anthropologist David Graeber, that we have begun to see the creation of the first effective planetary administrative system largely in order to protect the interests of creditors. (via Tim O’Reilly)
  2. Know Your History — where Google’s +1 came from (answer: Apache project).
  3. MIT Autonomous QuadcopterMIT drone makes a map of a room in real time using an X Box Kinect and is able to navigate through it. All calculations performed on board the multicopter. Wow. (via Slashdot and Sara Winge)
  4. How Great Entrepreneurs Think — leaving aside the sloppy open-mouth kisses to startups that “great entrepreneurs” implies, an interesting article comparing the mindsets of corporate execs with entrepreneurs. I’d love to read the full interviews and research paper. Sarasvathy explains that entrepreneurs’ aversion to market research is symptomatic of a larger lesson they have learned: They do not believe in prediction of any kind. “If you give them data that has to do with the future, they just dismiss it,” she says. “They don’t believe the future is predictable…or they don’t want to be in a space that is very predictable.” [...] the careful forecast is the enemy of the fortuitous surprise. (via Sacha Judd)
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