"text analysis" entries

Four short links: 13 January 2012

Four short links: 13 January 2012

Internet in Culture, Flash Security Tool, Haptic E-Books, and Facebook Mining Private Updates

  1. How The Internet Gets Inside Us (The New Yorker) — at any given moment, our most complicated machine will be taken as a model of human intelligence, and whatever media kids favor will be identified as the cause of our stupidity. When there were automatic looms, the mind was like an automatic loom; and, since young people in the loom period liked novels, it was the cheap novel that was degrading our minds. When there were telephone exchanges, the mind was like a telephone exchange, and, in the same period, since the nickelodeon reigned, moving pictures were making us dumb. When mainframe computers arrived and television was what kids liked, the mind was like a mainframe and television was the engine of our idiocy. Some machine is always showing us Mind; some entertainment derived from the machine is always showing us Non-Mind. (via Tom Armitage)
  2. SWFScan — Windows-only Flash decompiler to find hardcoded credentials, keys, and URLs. (via Mauricio Freitas)
  3. Paranga — haptic interface for flipping through an ebook. (via Ben Bashford)
  4. Facebook Gives Politico Deep Access to Users Political Sentiments (All Things D) — Facebook will analyse all public and private updates that mention candidates and an exclusive partner will “use” the results. Remember, if you’re not paying for it then you’re the product and not the customer.
Comment: 1
Four short links: 12 January 2012

Four short links: 12 January 2012

Smart Meter Snitches, Company Culture, Text Classification, and Live Face Substitution

  1. Smart Hacking for Privacy — can mine smart power meter data (or even snoop it) to learn what’s on the TV. Wow. (You can also watch the talk). (via Rob Inskeep)
  2. Conditioning Company Culture (Bryce Roberts) — a short read but thought-provoking. It’s easy to create mindless mantras, but I’ve seen the technique that Bryce describes and (when done well) it’s highly effective.
  3. hydrat (Google Code) — a declarative framework for text classification tasks.
  4. Dynamic Face Substitution (FlowingData) — Kyle McDonald and Arturo Castro play around with a face tracker and color interpolation to replace their own faces, in real-time, with celebrities such as that of Brad Pitt and Paris Hilton. Awesome. And creepy. Amen.
Comment: 1

The hidden language and "wonderful experience" of product reviews

Panagiotis Ipeirotis on the phrases and formatting of effective product reviews.

How much is an Amazon review — good or bad — worth? Computer scientist and NYU professor Panagiotis Ipeirotis analyzed the text in thousands of Amazon reviews to find out.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 9 January 2012

Four short links: 9 January 2012

Apple Factories, Open Source Spy Drones, Mail Files, and Text Topic Extraction

  1. Mr Daisey and the Apple Factor (This American Life) — episode looking at the claims of human rights problems in Apple’s Chinese factories.
  2. OpenPilot — open source UAVs with cameras. Yes, a DIY spy drone on autopilot. (via Jim Stogdill)
  3. mbox — more technical information than you ever thought you’d need, to be saved for the time when you have to parse mailbox files. It’s a nightmare. (via Hacker News)
  4. Maui (Google Code) — Maui automatically identifies main topics in text documents. Depending on the task, topics are tags, keywords, keyphrases, vocabulary terms, descriptors, index terms or titles of Wikipedia articles. GPLv3.
Comment: 1
Four short links: 28 December 2011

Four short links: 28 December 2011

Text Search, Cloud Filesystem, Javascript Parser, and Twitter Templates

  1. Terrier IR — open source (Mozilla) text search engine, now with Hadoop support.
  2. s3ql — open source (GPLv3) Linux filesystem which stores its data on Google Storage, Amazon S3, or OpenStack. (via Adam Shand)
  3. Esprima — open source (BSD) fast Javascript parser in Javascript. (via Javascript Weekly)
  4. Hogan.js — open source (Apache) Javascript templating engine from Twitter. If it proves anywhere near as good as Bootstrap, it’ll be heavily used.
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Four short links: 26 December 2011

Four short links: 26 December 2011

Text Analysis Bundle, Scala Probabilistic Modeling, Game Analytics, and Encouraging Writing

  1. Pattern — a BSD-licensed bundle of Python tools for data retrieval, text analysis, and data visualization. If you were going to get started with accessible data (Twitter, Google), the fundamentals of analysis (entity extraction, clustering), and some basic visualizations of graph relationships, you could do a lot worse than to start here.
  2. Factorie (Google Code) — Apache-licensed Scala library for a probabilistic modeling technique successfully applied to […] named entity recognition, entity resolution, relation extraction, parsing, schema matching, ontology alignment, latent-variable generative models, including latent Dirichlet allocation. The state-of-the-art big data analysis tools are increasingly open source, presumably because the value lies in their application not in their existence. This is good news for everyone with a new application.
  3. Playtomic — analytics as a service for gaming companies to learn what players actually do in their games. There aren’t many fields untouched by analytics.
  4. Write or Die — iPad app for writers where, if you don’t keep writing, it begins to delete what you wrote earlier. Good for production to deadlines; reflective editing and deep thought not included.
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Four short links: 22 December 2011

Four short links: 22 December 2011

Fuzzy Text, Big Data Crime, Map Visualization, and Attacking Server-Side Javascript

  1. Fuzzy String Matching in Python (Streamhacker) — useful if you’re to have a hope against the swelling dark forces powered by illiteracy and touchscreen keyboards.
  2. The Business of Illegal Data (Strata Conference) — fascinating presentation on criminal use of big data. “The more data you produce, the happier criminals are to receive and use it. Big data is big business for organized crime, which represents 15% of GDP.”
  3. Isarithmic Maps — an alternative to chloropleths for geodata visualization.
  4. Server-Side Javascript Injection (PDF) — a Blackhat talk about exploiting backend vulnerabilities with techniques learned from attacking Javascript frontends. Both this paper and the accompanying talk will discuss security vulnerabilities that can arise when software developers create applications or modules for use with JavaScript-based server applications such as NoSQL database engines or Node.js web servers. In the worst-case scenario, an attacker can exploit these vulnerabilities to upload and execute arbitrary binary files on the server machine, effectively granting him full control over the server.
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Four short links: 9 December 2011

Four short links: 9 December 2011

Designing Ubicomp, Online Community, Design Examples, and Ranking Discussions

  1. Critically Making the Internet of Things (Anne Galloway) — session notes from a conference, see also part two. Good thoughts, hastily captured. For example, this from Bruce Sterling: RFID + Superglue + Object ≠ IoT and the talk I want to see: “A study of how broken, hacked and malfunctioning digital road signs subvert the physical space of roadways.”
  2. Conquering the CHAOS of Online Community at StackExchange — StackExchange is doing some thoughtful work analysing conversations and channeling dissent into a healthy construction to guide future productive discussion. “We taught the users that it was alright to disagree, and gave them a set of arguments they could reference without every thread degenerating into a fight.”
  3. Little Big Details — one small detail done right, every day.
  4. Ranking Live Streams of Data (LinkedIn) — behind the “interesting discussions” report.
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Four short links: 6 December 2011

Four short links: 6 December 2011

Dispel Your Illusions, Simple Mac OS X Apps, Assisted Translation, and AutoTagging

  1. How to Dispel Your Illusions (NY Review of Books) — Freeman Dyson writing about Daniel Kahneman’s latest book. Only by understanding our cognitive illusions can we hope to transcend them.
  2. Appify-UI (github) — Create the simplest possible Mac OS X apps. Uses HTML5 for the UI. Supports scripting with anything and everything. (via Hacker News)
  3. Translation Memory (Etsy) — using Lucene/SOLR to help automate the translation of their UI. (via Twitter)
  4. Automatically Tagging Entities with Descriptive Phrases (PDF) — Microsoft Research paper on automated tagging. Under the hood it uses Map/Reduce and the Microsoft Dryad framework. (via Ben Lorica)
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Four short links: 18 November 2011

Four short links: 18 November 2011

Quantified Learner, Text Extraction, Backup Flickr, and Multitouch UI Awesomeness

  1. Learning With Quantified Self — this CS grad student broke Jeopardy records using an app he built himself to quantify and improve his ability to answer Jeopardy questions in different categories. This is an impressive short talk and well worth watching.
  2. Evaluating Text Extraction AlgorithmsThe gold standard of both datasets was produced by human annotators. 14 different algorithms were evaluated in terms of precision, recall and F1 score. The results have show that the best opensource solution is the boilerpipe library. (via Hacker News)
  3. Parallel Flickr — tool for backing up your Flickr account. (Compare to one day of Flickr photos printed out)
  4. Quneo Multitouch Open Source MIDI and USB Pad (Kickstarter) — interesting to see companies using Kickstarter to seed interest in a product. This one looks a doozie: pads, sliders, rotary sensors, with LEDs underneath and open source drivers and SDK. Looks almost sophisticated enough to drive emacs :-)
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