ENTRIES TAGGED "data analysis"

Four short links: 24 March 2014

Four short links: 24 March 2014

Google Flu, Embeddable JS, Data Analysis, and Belief in the Browser

  1. The Parable of Google Flu (PDF) — We explore two
    issues that contributed to [Google Flu Trends]’s mistakes—big data hubris and algorithm dynamics—and offer lessons for moving forward in the big data age.
    Overtrained and underfed?
  2. Duktape — a lightweight embeddable Javascript engine. Because an app without an API is like a lightbulb without an IP address: retro but not cool.
  3. Principles of Good Data Analysis (Greg Reda) — Once you’ve settled on your approach and data sources, you need to make sure you understand how the data was generated or captured, especially if you are using your own company’s data. Treble so if you are using data you snaffled off the net, riddled with collection bias and untold omissions. (via Stijn Debrouwere)
  4. Deep Belief Networks in Javascript — just object recognition in the browser. The code relies on GPU shaders to perform calculations on over 60 million neural connections in real time. From the ever-more-awesome Pete Warden.
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Decision making under uncertainty

Edge contributors say it's time to retire the search for one-size-fits-all answers.

The 2014 Edge Annual Question (EAQ) is out. This year, the question posed to the contributors is: What scientific idea is ready for retirement? As usual with the EAQ, it provokes thought and promotes discussion. I have only read through a fraction of the responses so far, but I think it is important to highlight a few Edge contributors who answered with a…
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Data Science for Business

What business leaders need to know about data and data analysis to drive their businesses forward.

A couple of years ago, Claudia Perlich introduced me to Foster Provost, her PhD adviser. Foster showed me the book he was writing with Tom Fawcett, and using in his teaching at NYU. Foster and Tom have a long history of applying data to practical business problems. Their…
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The vanishing cost of guessing

As society becomes increasingly data driven, it's critical to remember big data isn't a magical tool for predicting the future.

If you eat ice cream, you’re more likely to drown. That’s not true, of course. It’s just that both ice cream and swimming happen in the summer. The two are correlated — and ice cream consumption is a good predictor of drowning fatalities — but ice cream hardly causes drowning. These kinds of correlations are all around us, and big data…
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Stories over spreadsheets

Stories over spreadsheets

Kris Hammond on replacing rows and columns with sentences and paragraphs.

Imagine a future where clear language supplants spreadsheets. In a recent interview, Narrative Science CTO Kris Hammond explained how we might get there.

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Operations, machine learning and premature babies

An astonishing connection between web ops and medical care.

Machine learning and access to huge amounts of data allowed IBM to make an important discovery about premature infants. If web operations teams could capture everything — network data, environmental data, I/O subsystem data, etc. — what would they find out?

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Data as seeds of content

Data as seeds of content

A look at lesser-known ways to extract insight from data.

Visualizations are one way to make sense of data, but they aren't the only way. Robbie Allen reveals six additional outputs that help users derive meaningful insights from data.

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Automated science, deep data and the paradox of information

Automated science, deep data and the paradox of information

Be aware of the just-so data stories that sound reasonable but cannot be conclusively proven.

Bradley Voytek: "Our goal as data scientists should be to distill the essence of the data into something that tells as true a story as possible while being as simple as possible to understand."

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The unreasonable necessity of subject experts

The unreasonable necessity of subject experts

Experts make the leap from correct results to understood results.

We can't forget that data is ultimately about insight, and insight is inextricably tied to the
stories we build from the data. Subject experts are the ones who find the stories data wants to tell.

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Profile of the Data Journalist: The Homicide Watch

Chris Amico and Laura Norton Amico's project started as a spreadsheet. Now it's a community news platform.

To learn more about the people who are redefining the practice computer-assisted reporting, in some cases, building the newsroom stack for the 21st century, Radar conducted a series of email interviews with data journalists during the 2012 NICAR Conference. "It’s not just about the data, and it’s not just about the journalism, but it’s about meeting a community need in an innovative way," said Laura Norton Amico.

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