"data analytics" entries

Real-time, not batch-time, analytics with Hadoop

How big data, fast data, and real-time analytics work together in the real world.

Mines_British_Library_Flickr

Attend the VoltDB webcast on June 24, 2015 with John Hugg to learn more on how to build a fast data front-end to Hadoop.

Today, we often hear the phrase “The 3 Vs” in relation to big data: Volume, Variety and Velocity. With the interest and popularity of big data frameworks such as Hadoop, the focus has mostly centered on volume and data at rest. Common requirements here would be data ingestion, batch processing, and distributed queries. These are well understood. Increasingly, however, there is a need to manage and process data as it arrives, in real time. There may be great value in the immediacy of that data and the ability to act upon it very quickly. This is velocity and data in motion, also known as “fast data.” Fast data has become increasingly important within the past few years due to the growth in endpoints that now stream data in real time.

Big data + fast data is a powerful combination. However, adding real-time analytics to this mix provides the business value. Let’s look at a real example, originally described by Scott Jarr of VoltDB.

Consider a company that builds systems to manage physical assets in precious metal mines. Inside a mine, there are sensors on miners as well as shovels and other assets. For a lost shovel, minutes or hours of reporting latency may be acceptable. However, a sensor on a miner indicating a stopped heart should require immediate attention. The system should, therefore, be able to receive very fast data. Read more…

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Commodity data analytics for health care

Predixion service could signal a trend for smaller health facilities.

Analytics are expensive and labor intensive; we need them to be routine and ubiquitous. I complained earlier this year that analytics are hard for health care providers to muster because there’s a shortage of analysts and because every data-driven decision takes huge expertise.

Currently, only major health care institutions such as Geisinger, the Mayo Clinic, and Kaiser Permanente incorporate analytics into day-to-day decisions. Research facilities employ analytics teams for clinical research, but perhaps not so much for day-to-day operations. Large health care providers can afford departments of analysts, but most facilities — including those forming accountable care organizations — cannot.

Imagine that you are running a large hospital and are awake nights worrying about the Medicare penalty for readmitting patients within 30 days of their discharge. Now imagine you have access to analytics that can identify about 40 measures that combine to predict a readmission, and a convenient interface is available to tell clinicians in a simple way which patients are most at risk of readmission. Better still, the interface suggests specific interventions to reduce readmissions risk: giving the patient a 30-day supply of medication, arranging transportation to rehab appointments, etc. Read more…

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What the data world can learn from the fashion industry

How generating conversations can become one of the most important data assets for any organization.

FD_coverAt O’Reilly Research, we focus our attention on trends in technology adoption — which tools are adopted and in which industries. In doing so, we uncover interesting cross-disciplinary opportunities and discover what we can learn from innovations in other fields.

We’ve recently learned about the increasing role of data in the fashion industry, so we set out to uncover some of the players who are making disruptive changes using technology and analytics.

Our team asked Liza Kindred, founder of Third Wave Fashion, and Julie Steele, coauthor of Beautiful Visualization and Designing Data Visualizations, to take a closer look at these developments in their new report, “Fashioning Data: How fashion industry leaders innovate with data and what you can learn from what they know.” We think you’ll find some surprising applications of data and analytics in the fashion industry — applications that are useful regardless of the industry or organization you work within. And, we know we’re just at the beginning of what is likely a growing trend. Read more…

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Predictive data analytics is saving lives and taxpayer dollars in New York City

Michael Flowers explains why applying data science to regulatory data is necessary to use city resources better.

A predictive data analytics team in the Mayor's Office of New York City has been quietly using data science to find patterns in regulatory data that can then be applied to law enforcement, public safety, public health and better allocation of taxpayer resources.

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