ENTRIES TAGGED "Wikipedia"

Four short links: 8 May 2013

Four short links: 8 May 2013

Paperclip Computing, Packet Capture, Offline Wikipedia, and Sensor Databases

  1. How to Build a Working Digital Computer Out of Paperclips (Evil Mad Scientist) — from a 1967 popular science book showing how to build everything from parts that you might find at a hardware store: items like paper clips, little light bulbs, thread spools, wire, screws, and switches (that can optionally be made from paper clips).
  2. Moloch (Github) — an open source, large scale IPv4 packet capturing (PCAP), indexing and database system with a simple web GUI.
  3. Offline Wikipedia Reader (Amazon) — genius, because what Wikipedia needed to be successful was to be read-only. (via BoingBoing)
  4. Storing and Publishing Sensor Data — rundown of apps and sites for sensor data. (via Pete Warden)
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Four short links: 11 March 2013

Four short links: 11 March 2013

Ransom Money, High School CS, Wikipedia Links, and Social Teens

  1. Adventures in the Ransom Trade — between insurance, protection, and ransoms, Sean Gourley describes it as “one of the more interesting grey markets.” (via Sean Gourley)
  2. About High School Computer Science Teachers (Selena Deckelmann) — Selena gets an education in the state of high school computer science education.
  3. Learning From Big Data (Google Research) — the Wikilinks Corpus: 40 million total disambiguated mentions within over 10 million web pages [...] The mentions are found by looking for links to Wikipedia pages where the anchor text of the link closely matches the title of the target Wikipedia page. If we think of each page on Wikipedia as an entity (an idea we’ve discussed before), then the anchor text can be thought of as a mention of the corresponding entity.
  4. Teens Have Always Gone Where Identity Isn’tif you look back at one of the first dominant social platforms, AOL Instant Messenger, it looks a lot like the pseudonymous Tumblr and Snapchat of today in many respects. You used an avatar that was not your face. Your screenname was not indexed and not personally identifiable (mine was Goober1310).
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Strata Week: Add structured data, lose local flavor?

Strata Week: Add structured data, lose local flavor?

Wikidata's structure vs. diverse knowledge, and a look at the many factors behind Netflix's recommendations.

A critic says Wikidata could undermine Wikipedia's localized information. Also, Netflix explains why its recommendation engine is much more complicated than most people realize.

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Developer Week in Review: When game development met Kickstarter

Developer Week in Review: When game development met Kickstarter

From games to reference books, crowdsourcing is shaking up industries.

Crowdsourcing is changing how software development gets funded. It's also driving one of the great reference guides of the 20th century out of print.

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Four short links: 16 February 2012

Four short links: 16 February 2012

Wikipedia Fail, DIY Text Adventures, Antisocial Software, and Formats Matter

  1. The Undue Weight of Truth (Chronicle of Higher Education) — Wikipedia has become fossilized fiction because the mechanism of self-improvement is broken.
  2. Playfic — Andy Baio’s new site that lets you write text adventures in the browser. Great introduction to programming for language-loving kids and adults.
  3. Review of Alone Together (Chris McDowall) — I loved this review, its sentiments, and its presentation. Work on stuff that matters.
  4. Why ESRI As-Is Can’t Be Part of the Open Government Movement — data formats without broad support in open source tools are an unnecessary barrier to entry. You’re effectively letting the vendor charge for your data, which is just stupid.
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Four short links: 5 December 2011

Four short links: 5 December 2011

Spatial Search, Exposing Your Phone's Perfidity, School Unconference, and Wikipedia Viz

  1. VP Trees — a data structure for fast spatial searching. A form of nearest neighbour, useful for melodies (PDF) and image retrieval (PDF) and poetry. (via Reddit)
  2. iYou — iTunes plugin to show you all the stuff your phone collects about you.
  3. Bar Camps in Primary Schools — NZ teacher deploys bar camps among students. Great things happen.
  4. Realtime Wikipedia Edits — fascinating and hypnotic and inspirational and appalling and irrelevant all at once.

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Four short links: 14 November 2011

Four short links: 14 November 2011

Science Hack Days, YouTube Doggy Science, Antisocial Software, and Mind Reading with Wikipedia

  1. Science Hack Day SF Videos (justin.tv) — the demos from Science Hack Day SF. The journey of a thousand miles starts with a Hack Day.
  2. A Cross-Sectional Study of Canine Tail-Chasing and Human Responses to It, Using a Free Video-Sharing Website (PLoSone) — Approximately one third of tail-chasing dogs showed clinical signs, including habitual (daily or “all the time”) or perseverative (difficult to distract) performance of the behaviour. These signs were observed across diverse breeds. Clinical signs appeared virtually unrecognised by the video owners and commenting viewers; laughter was recorded in 55% of videos, encouragement in 43%, and the commonest viewer descriptors were that the behaviour was “funny” (46%) or “cute” (42%).
  3. RSS Died For Your Sins (Danny O’Brien) — if you have seven thousand people following you, a good six thousand of those are going to be people you don’t particularly like. The problem, as ever, is—how do you pick out the other thousand? Especially when they keep changing? I firmly believe that one of the pressing unsolved technological problems of the modern age is getting safely away from people you don’t like, without actually throttling them to death beforehand, nor somehow coming to the conclusion that they don’t exist, nor ending up turning yourself into a hateful monster.
  4. Generating Text from Functional Brain Images (Frontiers in Human Neuroscience) — We built a model of the mental semantic representation of concrete concepts from text data and learned to map aspects of such representation to patterns of activation in the corresponding brain image. Turns out that the clustering of concepts in Wikipedia is similar to how they’re clustered in the brain. They found clusters in Wikipedia, mapped to the brain activity for known words, and then used that mapping to find words for new images of brain activity. (via The Economist)
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Publishing News: Amazon fires up B&N and BAM

Publishing News: Amazon fires up B&N and BAM

An Amazon deal starts a bookseller war, content tidbits from conferences, and the application of Wikipedia's success.

In this week’s publishing news: B&N and BAM pulled DC Comics graphic novels off the shelves in a huff. Also, interesting data points surface at book conferences, and what newspapers can learn from Wikipedia.

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Four short links: 29 September 2011

Four short links: 29 September 2011

Princeton Open Access, Wikipedia Culture, Food for Thought, and Trolled by Sussman

  1. Princeton Open Access Report (PDF) — academics will need written permission to assign copyright of a paper to a journal. Of course, the faculty already had exclusive rights in the scholarly articles they write; the main effect of this new policy is to prevent them from giving away all their rights when they publish in a journal. (via CC Huang)
  2. Good Faith Collaboration — a book on Wikipedia’s culture, from MIT Press. Distributed, appropriately, under a Creative Commons Non-Commercial Share-Alike license.
  3. The Local-Global Flip — an EDGE conversation (or monologue) by Jaron Lanier that contains more thought-provocation per column-inch than anything else you’ll read this week. [I]ncreasing efficiency by itself doesn’t employ people. There is a difference between saving and making money when you’re unemployed. Once you’re already rich, saving money and making money is the same thing, but for people who are on the bottom or even in the middle classes, saving money doesn’t help you if you don’t have the money to save in the first place. and The beauty of money is it creates a system of people leaving each other alone by mutual agreement. It’s the only invention that does that that I’m aware of. In a world of finite limits where you don’t have an infinite West you can expand into, money is the thing that gives you a little bit of peace and quiet, where you can say, “It’s my money, I’m spending it”. and I’m astonished at how readily a great many people I know, young people, have accepted a reduced economic prospect and limited freedoms in any substantial sense, and basically traded them for being able to screw around online. There are just a lot of people who feel that being able to get their video or their tweet seen by somebody once in a while gets them enough ego gratification that it’s okay with them to still be living with their parents in their 30s, and that’s such a strange tradeoff. And if you project that forward, obviously it does become a problem. are things I’m still chewing on, many days after first reading.
  4. Trolled by Gerry Sussman (Bryan O’Sullivan) — Bryan gave a tutorial on Haskell to a conference on leading-edge programming languages and distributed systems. At one point, Gerry had a pretty amusing epigram to offer. “Haskell is the best of the obsolete programming languages!” he pronounced, with a mischievous look. Now, I know when I’m being trolled, so I said nothing and waited a moment, whereupon he continued, “but don’t take it the wrong way—I think they’re all obsolete!”
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Four short links: 20 September 2011

Four short links: 20 September 2011

Android Plan 9, Virtualization OS, Rogue Games, and Wikipedia Semantics

  1. Plan 9 on Androidreplacing the Java stack on Android fans with Inferno. Inferno is the Plan 9 operating system originally from Bell Labs.
  2. SmartOS — Joyent-created open source operating system built for virtualization. (via Nelson Minar)
  3. libtcod — open source library for creating Rogue-like games. (via Nelson Minar)
  4. Wikipedia Miner — toolkit for working with semantics in Wikipedia pages, e.g. find the connective topics that link two chosen topics. (via Alyona Medelyan)
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