Report from HIMSS 2012: toward interoperability and openness

I was wondering how it would feel to be in the midst of 35,000 people whose livelihoods are driven by the decisions of a large institution at the moment when that institution releases a major set of rules. I didn’t really find out, though. The 35,000 people I speak of are the attendees of the HIMSS conference and the institution is the Department of Health and Human Services. But HHS just sort of half-released the rules (called Stage 2 of meaningful use), telling us that they would appear online tomorrow and meanwhile rushing over a few of the key points in a presentation that drew overflow crowds in two rooms.

The reaction, I sensed, was a mix of relief and frustration. Relief because Farzad Mostashari, National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, promised us the rules would be familiar and hewed closely to what advisors had requested. Frustration, however, at not seeing the details. The few snippets put up on the screen contained enough ambiguities and poorly worded phrases that I’m glad there’s a 60-day comment period before the final rules are adopted.

There isn’t much one can say about the Stage 2 rules until they are posted and the experts have a chance to parse them closely, and I’m a bit reluctant to throw onto the Internet one of potentially 35,000 reactions to the announcement, but a few points struck me enough to be worth writing about. Mostashari used his pulpit for several pronouncements about the rules:

  • HHS would push ahead on goals for interoperability and health information exchange. “We can’t wait five years,” said Mostashari. He emphasized the phrase “standard-based” in referring to HIE.

  • Patient engagement was another priority. To attest to Stage 2, institutions will have to allow at least half their patients to download and transfer their records.

  • They would strive for continuous quality improvement and clinical decision support, key goals enabled by the building blocks of meaningful use.

Two key pillars of the Stage 2 announcement are requirements to use the Direct project for data exchange and HL7′s consolidated CDA for the format (the only data exchange I heard mentioned was a summary of care, which is all that most institutions exchange when a patient is referred).

The announcement demonstrates the confidence that HHS has in the Direct project, which it launched just a couple years ago and that exemplifies a successful joint government/private sector project. Direct will allow health care providers of any size and financial endowment to use email or the Web to share summaries of care. (I mentioned it in yesterday’s article.) With Direct, we can hope to leave the cumbersome and costly days of health information exchange behind. The older and more complex CONNECT project will be an option as well.

The other half of that announcement, regarding adoption of the CDA (incarnated as a CCD for summaries of care), is a loss for the older CCR format, which was an option in Stage 1. The CCR was the Silicon Valley version of health data, a sleek and consistent XML format used by Google Health and Microsoft HealthVault. But health care experts criticized the CCR as not rich enough to convey the information institutions need, so it lost out to the more complex CCD.

The news on formats is good overall, though. The HL7 consortium, which has historically funded itself by requiring organizations to become members in order to use its standards, is opening some of them for free use. This is critical for the development of open source projects. And at an HL7 panel today, a spokesperson said they would like to head more in the direction of free licensing and have to determine whether they can survive financially while doing so.

So I’m feeling optimistic that U.S. health care is moving “toward interoperability and openness,” the phrase I used in the title to his article and also used in a posting from HIMSS two years ago.

HHS allowed late-coming institutions (those who began the Stage 1 process in 2011) to continue at Stage 1 for another year. This is welcome because they have so much work to do, but means that providers who want to demonstrate Stage 2 information exchange may have trouble because they can’t do it with other providers who are ready only for Stage 1.

HHS endorsed some other standards today as well, notably SNOMED for diseases and LRI for lab results. Another nice tidbit from the summit includes the requirement to use electronic medication administration (for instance, bar codes to check for errors in giving medicine) to foster patient safety.

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