ENTRIES TAGGED "arduino"

Four short links: 1 December 2011

Four short links: 1 December 2011

DRM Good for Amazon, Arduino Updated, Open Source Foundations, Distributed Search

  1. Cutting Their Own Throats (Charlie Stross) — DRM on ebooks gives Amazon a great tool for locking ebook customers into the Kindle platform. This essay is gold and so very true. Read, believe.
  2. v1.0 of Arduino Out — this is the dev environment, with language additions and lots of features in the libraries. Glad to see the 1.0 stamp put on this important piece of the homebrew hardware world.
  3. Koha and Why We Need Foundations — Simon Phipps looks into the Koha trademark dispute and says that it shows why open source needs foundations (collective IP ownership).
  4. Majestic-12a World Wide Web search engine based on concepts of distributing workload in a similar fashion achieved by successful projects such as SETI@home and distributed.net.
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Developer Week in Review: Adobe sends Flex to Apache

Developer Week in Review: Adobe sends Flex to Apache

Flex goes FLOSS, some cheap Pi, and brain on a chip.

Adobe just gave away Flex, a new single-board computer might dethrone Arduino as the tool of choice for makers, and researchers bring us a step closer to our robotic overlords.

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Fighting the next mobile war

Fighting the next mobile war

Recent moves by Apple and Google could ignite the external accessories space.

While you'll likely interact with your smartphone tomorrow in much the same way you interacted with it today, it's quite possible that your smartphone will interact with the world in a very different way. The next mobile war has already begun.

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Getting physical with Android, NFC and the ADK

Getting physical with Android, NFC and the ADK

Android meets Arduino as the ADK and NFC allow new physical interfaces.

Brian Jepson and Tyler Moskowite discuss Near Field Communication, the Open Android Development Kit, and the role Android can play in hardware hacking.

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Google I/O 2011: 5 things to keep watching

Google I/O 2011: 5 things to keep watching

From Chromebooks to Arduino to bots: Mike Loukides examines I/O's big themes.

Google I/O 2011 was marked by the Android Accessory Development Kit, the Chromebook vision and lots of robots. Mike Loukides examines the big I/O developments and their possible repercussions.

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The secret is to bang the rocks together

The secret is to bang the rocks together

Arduino is a building block for the world to come.

Every so often a piece of technology can become a lever that lets people move the world, just a little bit. The Arduino is one of those levers.

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Four short links: 14 December 2010

Four short links: 14 December 2010

Twitter Influence, Open Source Visualized, Arduino Autopilot, and Customer Respect

  1. The Million Follower Fallacy (PDF) — We found that indegree represents a user’s popularity, but is not related to other important notions of influence such as engaging audience, i.e., retweets and mentions. Retweets are driven by the content value of a tweet, while mentions are driven by the name value of the user. Such subtle differences lead to dissimilar groups of the top Twitter users; users who have high indegree do not necessarily spawn many retweets or mentions. This finding suggests that indegree alone reveals very little about the influence of a user. Research confirms what we all knew, that idiots who chase follower numbers have the influence they deserve. (via Steve O’Grady on Twitter, indirectly)
  2. Geocoding Github: Visualizing Distributed Open-Source Development — work for the Stanford visualization class, plotting open source commits on maps over time. See this page for the interactive explorer. (via Michael Driscoll on Twitter)
  3. ArduPilotMega 1.0 Launched — autopilot built on the Arduino platform. (via Chris Anderson on Twitter)
  4. Lessons of the Gawker Security Mess (Forbes blog) — nice deconstruction of what happened. In the chat, Gawker’s Hamilton Nolan, after hearing that it is just Gawker users who have been compromised, remarks “oh, well. unimportant”. Gawker’s Richard Lawson wants to know if the breach is limited to “just the peasants?” Don’t trash talk about your users in company channels. The business that forgets it lives and dies on its customers is a business that will eventually be hated by its customers. (via Nahum Wild on Twitter)
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Four short links: 4 October 2010

Four short links: 4 October 2010

Electronic Health Records, LilyPad Appeal, Time Management, and Locking Library

  1. Two Brothers Await Broad Use of Medical E-Records (New York Times) — The Doerrs’ software company is only one of many hoping to cash in on the national mandate for digital medical records. The companies range from giants like General Electric to specialists like Athenahealth that cater to small physician practices. They, like the Doerrs, are betting that the law will help create a turning point for the economics of digital health records, opening the door to rapid adoption by doctors and a thriving business at last. NZ-based Orion Health is expanding at a great rate in the US, doing electronic health records. The tide is beginning to turn away from paper, thank goodness. (via DrChrisPaton on Twitter)
  2. On Feminism and Microcontrollers (Benjamin Mako Hill) — We found evidence to support the suggestion that LilyPad is disproportionally appealing to women, as compared to Arduino (we estimated that about 9% of Arduino purchasers were female while 35% of LilyPad purchasers were). We found evidence that suggests that a very large proportion of people making high-visibility projects using LilyPad are female as compared to Arduino (65% for LilyPad, versus 2% for Arduino).
  3. Pomodoro Technique — time management system. (via auchmill on Twitter)
  4. Lock-free Data Structure Library in C — free library offering list, queue, ringbuffer, stack, ….
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Four short links: 4 August 2010

Four short links: 4 August 2010

Python Reasoning, Learning the Right Way, Curated Folksonomy, Arduino Image Correction

  1. FuXiPython-based, bi-directional logical reasoning system for the semantic web from the folks at the Open Knowledge Foundation. (via About Inferencing)
  2. Harness the Power of Being an IdiotI learn by trying to build something, there’s no other way I can discover the devils-in-the-details. Unfortunately that’s an incredibly inefficient way to gain knowledge. I basically wander around stepping on every rake in the grass, while the A Students memorize someone else’s route and carefully pick their way across the lawn without incident. My only saving graces are that every now and again I discover a better path, and faced with a completely new lawn I have an instinct for where the rakes are.
  3. Stack Overflow’s Curated Folksonomy — community-driven tag synonym system to reduce the chaos of different names for the same thing. (via Skud)
  4. Image Deblurring using Inertial Measurement Sensors (Microsoft Research) — using Arduino to correct motion blur. (via Jon Oxer)
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Hardware hacking heaven

Hardware hacking heaven

OSCON's hardware track looks at ways to hack the world around you.

Hacking isn't just for software anymore. A full range of open source hardware hacks — everything from Arduino to parallel programming to small-form computing — will be discussed at OSCON this year. With the current slate of tools, it's never been easier to write code that runs on low-power, small-format devices. And many of these tools are familiar to conventional software developers.

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