ENTRIES TAGGED "Gov 2.0"

The dark side of data

In a world of big, open data, "privacy by design" will become even more important.

A few weeks ago, Tom Slee published “Seeing Like a Geek,” a thoughtful article on the dark side of open data. He starts with the story of a Dalit community in India, whose land was transferred to a group…
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Four short links: 19 July 2012

Four short links: 19 July 2012

Answers not Maps, Government in Web Sites, Future of Manufacturing, The .000063% Influencers

  1. The Future of a Map is Its Information (The Atlantic) — maps are how we display data when we, the brain, wish to answer a question. Technology is rapidly expanding the questions we don’t need to look at a map to answer: directions, weather forecasts, dining …. (via Flowing Data)
  2. Governments Don’t Have Websites, Governments Are Websites (MySociety) — the best part about MySociety’s recent funding is that Tom Steinberg is blogging more. The majority of citizens don’t have deep, all encompassing, everyday interactions with the state – at most they drop their kids at school every day, or visit the GP a few times a year. That’s as physically close as they get. To these people, interacting with government already feels somewhat like interacting with Amazon. It sends them benefits, passports, recycling bins, car tax disks from mysterious dispatch offices and it demands money and information in return. The difference is in emotional tone – the Amazon online interactions tend to be seamless, the government online interactions either painful or impossible – time to pick up the phone.
  3. The Future of Manufacturing is America not China (Foreign Policy) — robots + AI + low-cost or shared public manufacturing facilities = the future of manufacturing.
  4. Captured America (The Atlantic) — Larry Lessig observes the tilted playing field responsible for America’s inability to govern itself: A tiny number of Americans — .26 percent — give more than $200 to a congressional campaign. .05 percent give the maximum amount to any congressional candidate. .01 percent give more than $10,000 in any election cycle. And .000063 percent — 196 Americans — have given more than 80 percent of the super-PAC money spent in the presidential elections so far.
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We the People need our existing Bill of Rights to apply in the digital domain

Why propose principles for Internet freedom and a "Digital Bill of Rights" when existing ones will do?

How the Bill of Rights is being upheld in a digital context is, to say the least, an interesting living story to follow. The passage of a resolution that human rights must also be protected on the Internet in the United Nations Human Rights Council was a historic affirmation of the principle that “the same rights that people have…
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Predictive data analytics is saving lives and taxpayer dollars in New York City

Michael Flowers explains why applying data science to regulatory data is necessary to use city resources better.

A predictive data analytics team in the Mayor's Office of New York City has been quietly using data science to find patterns in regulatory data that can then be applied to law enforcement, public safety, public health and better allocation of taxpayer resources.

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The emerging political force of the network of networks

12 talks from the 2012 Personal Democracy Forum worth watching and sharing.

The ninth Personal Democracy Forum explored the nexus of technology, politics and campaigns. What's happening online matters offline. Indeed, the barrier between the virtual and physical worlds has fallen.

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mHealth apps are just the beginning of the disruption in healthcare from open health data

Rockstars from music, government and industry convened around healthcare at the 2012 Health Datapalooza

Two years ago, the potential of government making health information as useful as weather data may well have felt like an abstraction to many observers. In June 2012, real health apps and services are here, holding the potential to massive disrupt healthcare for the better.

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US CTO seeks to scale agile thinking and open data across federal government

US CTO seeks to scale agile thinking and open data across federal government

Todd Park is looking for Presidential Innovation Fellows to help government work better.

In this interview, U.S. chief technology officer Todd Park lays out his ambitious agenda to apply technology in the public interest. Park has introduced new presidential fellowships and programs to scale open data across the federal government, releasing more health information and making digital government citizen-centric.

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Profile of the Data Journalist: The Data News Editor

John Keefe learned data journalism from the online community and applied it to public radio.

John Keefe is a senior editor for data news and journalism technology at WNYC public radio, based in New York City, NY. He attracted widespread attention when an online map he built using available data beat the Associated Press with Iowa caucus results earlier this year.

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21st century smarter government is 'data-centric' and 'digital first,' says US CIO

US CIO Steven VanRoekel says that machine-readable open data must be the 'new default' in government.

rom adjusting to the needs of an increasingly mobile federal workforce to moving to the cloud to developing a strategy for big data, it's safe to say that federal CIO Steven VanRoekel has a lot on his plate.

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Open source is interoperable with smarter government at the CFPB

Open source is interoperable with smarter government at the CFPB

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has aligned its open source policy with its mission.

CFPB CIO Chris Willey and acting deputy CIO Matthew Burton discuss the agency's new open source policy, government IT, security, programming in-house, the myths around code-sharing, and big data.

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